A paper on the holistic treatment of Endometriosis

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The Ohlone Herbal Center published Whitney Staeb’s apprenticeship paper in October 2016 about the holistic treatment approaches of Endometriosis.  If you’d like to read the 16-page report in it’s entirety, please click here.

It discusses herbs and flower essences that may help ease inflammation and symptoms.  Although it does not discuss doses, it does talk about the supposed medicinal properties of each and combinations that may help during cycles.  If intrigued, read the paper and consult with your healthcare provider and an herbalist.

Diet and proper nutrition play a large role possibly controlling Endometriosis symptoms.  She identifies some “ideal foods” that may be incorporated into, and excluded from, your diet.

Lifestyle changes such as switching feminine hygiene products, exercising, taking warm baths, using heating pads, and practicing good self-care may also ease the physical and mental issues of Endometriosis.

I encourage you to read her paper yourself (click here).  See if any of it speaks to you.  And, again, please do your own research (look for the pros and cons of each listed suggestion) and speak with your healthcare provider before starting any new regimen.

Have you ever, or do you presently, take any of the herbs/supplements referenced in this paper?  Please share your experiences with us in the comments below. Your journey may help others!

Yours,

Lisa

7 thoughts on “A paper on the holistic treatment of Endometriosis

  1. Thank you for sharing this!!!

    On Tue, Dec 20, 2016 at 1:33 PM, Bloomin’ Uterus wrote:

    > Bloomin’ Uterus posted: ” The Ohlone Herbal Center published Whitney > Staeb’s apprenticeship paper in October 2016 about the holistic treatment > approaches of Endometriosis. If you’d like to read the 16-page report in > it’s entirety, please click here. It discusses herbs and flow” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you for sharing this! I’m aware of the herbs that are great for women (nettles, raspberry leaf, licorice, wild yam) but leery about taking them during IVF cycles–so I don’t. What I found so interesting was her mention of the relationship to candida and endo! I had a horrible couple years of yeast infections that none of my doctors could figure out. (This was all before getting diagnosed with endo) The only thing that stopped the yeast infections was boric acid.
    Anti-inflammation living seems theway to go.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m fascinated by the link between endo and candida. I have struggled with candida overgrowth most of my life, and my father has had similar issues. I did a candida diet at one point that helped, but once I stopped the strict routine, I believe the issue came back. It makes sense that they’re all linked – either one causing the other, or predisposition to one leads to a predisposition to the other.

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  4. I tried to read this report, but was getting a 404 error when I clicked the link. But I would like to share what has helped for me regarding natural/alternative treatments.
    I totally agree that diet and exercise is key to managing endometriosis. But I have found what is even more important is managing mental and emotional health, in conjunction with soothing exercises such as qigong and meditation and yoga. When I changed my life in a way that meant I could be happier-for example, I quit a job I hated, I got psychotherapy and studied a range of energy medicine techniques, I eventually got to the point where my endometriosis went into remission and I am 98% pain free. I was diagnosed with stage four endometriosis and my pelvis was a total mess. My bowel was stuck to my uterus, I had deep infiltrating lesions in all areas, and had large chocolate cysts on my ovaries. I definitely did not have a simple case. I spent a lot of time studying how the mind affects the body and looked at things that felt discordant in my life, and worked towards changing them. I wouldn’t go as far to say I am ‘cured’ but I am definitely in remission where my life looks extremely different today than it did when I was first diagnosed. I take no medications now-not even when I have my period. I believe that despite all the research around endometriosis, one of the key things that is missing in treating it is looking at the whole person and their emotional makeup.

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