Share Your Story: L. George

Text that reads "I am not sure what to do next."

L. George was diagnosed when they were 25 years old. Today, at 52, they share their arduous journey with us.

L.’s Journey:   This is really tough to tell, as I have suffered with this awful disease for so long. I barely used to notice my periods in high school. Then, around age 21, the pain became so unbearable, but I just thought it was normal period pain. I never believed in going to doctors or taking any kind of pharmaceutical medication for pain. My mom raised me to never take aspirin or go to the hospital, no antibiotics for the frequent ear infections and bronchial infections I seemed to get a lot growing up. It was not uncommon for me to have a high fever (over 105F) as a child and ‘sweat’ it out, after dealing with it for at least a week wrapped in thick blankets to make me sweat. I never took any aspirin, or other OTC for the pain I felt at age 21.

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Share Your Story: Melissa

Man and woman standing side by side

A year ago, Melissa was diagnosed with Endometriosis (at 37 years old), but her symptoms became noticeable in her 20s. It took a decade to get answers…

Melissa’s Journey:   I first noticed that something was wrong when I was in my mid 20’s. I would have extreme pain in my lower back, lots of gas, and lots of pain when going to the bathroom. I noticed that a week before my periods it would burn when I peed and that would last until a week after my period (total of 3 weeks). I also dealt with bouts of constipation and diarrhea.

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Endometriosis & the Diaphragm

Courtesy of Wikimedia

If you’ve been a long-time follower of the blog, you may remember in 2014 when my surgeon found Endometriosis on my diaphragm. Several years later, it had completely disappeared (yay!). And it hasn’t been found in any of my subsequent surgeries. This research has been a lot of fun because of my own personal journey.

We’ve previously shared Endo Lady UK‘s experience with her own diaphragmatic Endometriosis, as well as a surgery to remove diaphragmatic Endo. We’ve even had a few brave readers, Lyndsay and Tabitha, share their own stories about endo on their diaphragm.

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Inguinal Hernia & Endometriosis

Inguinal canal in female courtesy of https://www.slideshare.net/vernonpashi/surgical-anatomy-of-the-inguinal-canal

Recently, a study hit my inbox about Endometriosis mimicking an inguinal hernia. So, of course, my interest was piqued and research had to take place! Be warned, though, it’s considered VERY rare. In all the literature I’ve read, only 42 cases have been referenced as being documented inguinal Endo. But when has rarity stopped me from sharing something about Endometriosis? Yeah. Never. Here we go!

What is AN inguinal hernia?

An inguinal hernia is the most common type of hernia (about 70% of hernias are inguinal) and usually manifests as a small lump in the groin area. Both men and women can get inguinal hernias, but it’s apparently more common in men. It occurs if there’s a small hole in your abdominal cavity which allows fat or intestines to seep through, which can a lump or swelling to occur.

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My 4th Endo Excision Surgery

"Uterus & Guts," created by Ivy Denton
@deathwindchimes 

Before I get started, let me explain the image above. A talented artist by the name of Ivy Denton created it for me (they also created the EndoGuy and PoopChuteSnakie you’ll see below). They’re taking commissions if you’re interested in throwing ideas their way! “What is it,” you may be asking yourself. It’s a whimsical interpretation of my insides: a uterus with two cervix, no fallopian tubes (hence the band-aids and floating ovaries), and it’s accompanied by it’s new buddy: an intestine missing some pieces. I think it’s adorable! Thanks, Ivy!!


On with the good stuff! If you didn’t already know, back in July 2018 during an excision surgery Dr. Kurtulus discovered a pair of Endo lesions on my small intestine . He brought in a colo-rectal surgeon, Dr. Schultzel, to look at it and decide if we could remove it then. Unfortunately, it was deemed too deep and risky without a proper bowel prep and a future resection would take place.

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Endometriosis & the Kidneys

A doodle of a human kidney pointing at a diagram of the renal system

In the past, I’ve researched how Endometriosis can affect the renal system, specifically the bladder or ureters, and how that could even cause blockages that cause kidney issues and severe problems.

Today, I’m going to talk about Endometriosis and the actual kidney.

A study published in October of 2018 discussed a 45-year-old woman who had flank pain and blood in her urine.  Imaging studies found a mass on her left kidney.  A surgery was performed to remove the suspected renal mass and a portion of her kidney, and pathology confirmed it was an Endometriosis lesion.  It was removed from her “renal parenchyma,” which is the solid part of the kidney that filters blood and makes urine.

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Share Your Story: Daniela

Quote: I feel hopeless

Daniela was diagnosed with Endometriosis when she was 22 years old.  Two years later, she shares her Endo journey with us.

Daniela’s Journey:  Hi everyone, my name is Daniela and I was raised in a small town near the border in Mexico and I am 24 years old. I had my first period when I was 9 and I remember that day like it was yesterday because it haunts me. I remember the face of my mom and grandma as if I was going to die. My childhood was over at that moment my body started to change drastically.

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Share Your Story: Kathryn

Quote that reads "I will never give this despicable disease the satisfaction of beating me...ever...

Kathryn was diagnosed with Endometriosis when she was 30 years old.  Three years later, she found our blog and wanted to share her story with us.  It’s a heartbreaking and devastating tale, but one many of us can relate to.  And she will continue to hold her head high, undefeated.

Kathryn’s Journey:   I suffered a horrible car accident in July almost three years ago. The bruising from the seat belt was so bad it took months to heal. Then, in December six months after the accident, I collapsed at work in crippling pain and had to go to the hospital. There they found cysts on my right ovary and uterus. One week later, my gynie is telling me a protein in my blood that detects ovarian cancer which should be no higher than 2 was 171. The next three months I was in a horrible nightmare of doctors telling me I would need a hysterectomy and chemo and would be fighting for my life. I had to make the agonizing choice of pulling my organs out when it wasn’t really a choice at all… And I did it with peace and as much grace as I could. Another month later, I underwent surgery. When I was awake after the tumors on my ovary had been benign and what it had actually been was severe endometriosis. He cut it out, but refused to remove the pipes causing it. When the surgeon told me it would be back, I sobbed… I don’t know why… But I was devastated. Six months later the pain returned. I had been fully cut open from stem to stern the first time. The second time they did a laparoscopy. And discovered the ovary that had the tumor developed a blood cyst that had engulfed the entire ovary. Worse, my fallopian tube was now being twisted and pulled into the same ovary. My gynie did not realize what he was getting into as the sonogram didn’t show much… But he said my tube should be a twizzler and my ovary a walnut. Mine had become a churro and a softball… Two surgeries, six months apart, with no help or sympathy from my now ex-husband… And they still wouldn’t remove all of it… I wanted to have a child of my own but…. God had different plans for me… It still hurts… And now it’s back. I found Lisa’s blog and was overjoyed I was not alone… That the bitterness and hatred of this disease is shared by many sisters. But I can’t do this any more. I want my life back. My endo was so bad it made a blood test show insanely positive for cancer. And the real kicker is that when I was suing the bastard who hit me in that car accident… My insurance company told my lawyer that it sounded to her like a blessing in disguise… I may never have found out there was a problem if I hadn’t been STRUCK by a car. The cruelest part is her daughter was going through chemo for ovarian cancer herself…. I want the pain to stop. It hurts knowing I cannot have children… And I am devastated when I ask myself “why me!” I had been fine up until that car accident… And since then… I’ve had nothing but pain bitterness and rage… And yet, I march on… Because I will never give this Despicable disease the satisfaction of beating me… EVER.

Words of Advice:  Go to your gynie regularly and make them aware of your symptoms and pain level. Try to exclude as many triggers as possible… I am a migraine with aura sufferer and cannot have hormonal birth control which is one of the best defenses against endo… But do not give up and find a community like this one that offers support and love for all suffering and dealing with this devastating disease. Never let your doctor downplay your pain or your gut feeling. If they don’t help you then find someone who can. Don’t suffer alone… I thought I was alone… But this blog showed me that I really am no less a woman and no less beautiful even if my plumbing is yanked out. And remember… YOU ARE FABULOUS!

The Last Word: Please keep writing and updating your blog. I found it just by searching if alcohol affected endometriosis. You gave me more information about my health than my doctor ever did. Thank you… So much! And I love the blogs name.😊

If you would like to contact Kathryn, please feel free to e-mail her.

I want to send a special Thank You out to Kathryn for being brave enough to share her journey with us today!  You are NOT alone in this, and you never will be again.  You have my e-mail address…and I’ll forward you my phone number.  Please feel free to use both as often as you wish.  Much love.  And sending hugs and smooshes your way.   ❤ Yours, Lisa.

Paper with "tell your story" written on it

And if YOU would like to share your story, I would love to share it.  The best part about this disease is the strong network of love and support from our fellow EndoSisters, and our friends and family, too.

Yours, Lisa.