Share Your Story: BMW

photos of Endosister, BMW

BMW has asked that I share her Endometriosis journey with you today. She was diagnosed when she was 13 years old and is now 32. We live in the same area, so I look forward to getting to know her better!

BMW’s JOURNEY: 

Where to begin… As I lay curled up in the fetal position holding my stomach with one hand typing with the other. I find myself just wanting to talk to someone anyone… Wait no not anyone someone who understands. I’m in pain.

And not take a ibuprofen and lay down pain. But mental and physical anguish.

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Share Your Story : Marixsa

EndoWarrior logo

Marixsa is a fellow blogger and Endo advocate.  She was diagnosed when she was 28 years old.  Now 33, her story is a heartbreaking, yet encouraging, one.  Almost two decades of suffering without a diagnosis, being told she was exaggerating, living in fear of intimacy, missed diagnoses (not misdiagnosis…but literally doctors not seeing her Endometriosis while in surgery), followed by a myriad of additional surgeries, emotional rollercoasters, fertility treatments, and miscarriage.  Although scarred, Marixsa is truly a strong and beautiful Warrior, rich in faith and determination.  She continues to fight, for herself and for other EndoSisters.    And I hold her among my heroes.

Marixsa’s Journey: Like so many women, endometriosis affected me years before I was diagnosed. It’s been quite a journey, which is why this section is so long. Here’s where this road has taken me:

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Reader’s Choice : C-Sections & Endometriosis

A friend asked me to look up any connections between Endometriosis and Cesarean Sections.  So, here we go.  Lots of science in this one!  Some studies show that less than 1% of women who undergo a cesarean section end up developing incisional Endometriosis (Endometriosis in or along the c-section scar).  However, that tiny little 1% number has a staggering amount of studies involving a lot of women who suffer from this form of Endo.

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Endometriosis on your skin

Diagram of human skin

It’s about time I research more about Endometriosis being found in places other than your pelvic region.  We’ve already covered lungs, spine, and eyes, and today we’re going to delve into cases of Endometriosis and skin.  Skin? Yes, skin.  I’ve read that it’s rare, just like the other areas outside of the pelvic cavity…but, it does occur.  Some theorize it is implanted via the lymphatic orpro vascular systems; others think the cells are transplanted via surgery.

There seem to be two common categories of Endometriosis and the skin : spontaneous Endometriosis and scar Endometriosis.  Spontaneous Endo simply appears in random places on healthy skin (cutaneous or subcutaneous).  Scar Endo is found within scar tissue from prior surgeries or injuries.  It appears that surgical excision/removal of the Endometriosis lesions from the skin is the most common and effective way of handling the lesions.  Some surgeries may leave defects, which may (or may not) be repaired or rebuilt with a surgical mesh.  Some studies suggest that hormonal treatment may be too harsh for the patient for solitary lesions.

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