Endo & Liver Function

Diagram of human digestive system

Most of my blogs are started out of my own curiosity, and this one is no different.

I’ve read in numerous sources that people with Endometriosis need to keep our livers in tip-top condition; well-greased and in proper working order.  I’ve seen a few Facebook posts from other EndoWarriors that they have heightened levels of *something* when they have a liver panel blood test done, and they wonder if their Endometriosis may have something to do with that.  That struck a chord with me because I have Gilbert’s Syndrome, which is a liver disease diagnosed through heightened liver panel results.

Does my Endo affect my liver’s functions? And does that, in turn, add to or affect my Gilbert’s Syndrome? My liver blood panel test results?

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Share Your Story : Lisa

A red-headed pirate laughing and holding her tankard of ale

I realized that I’ve asked you to share your story, but haven’t actually put mine out there in one place (maybe a snippet here or there)….time to get everything out on paper so it leaves my head and heart (sorry it’s so loooooong…I couldn’t stop!).  I was diagnosed when I was 35 years old in 2014. 

My Journey:  I started my period when I was 12 or 13 years old.  I remember them hurting (but not as devastating as they have in my adult years), but figured it was normal.  I grew up hearing we were cursed because of Eve’s decision to sin, punished into pain and childbirth. I also heard that some of my family members had really painful periods. So again, it was normal. Classmates said they had cramps, too…so I figured mine were just normal. I became that girl in Junior High and High School that would walk around with a hoodie tied around her waist every month because I’d almost always overflow.  I had classmates come up to me during the really hard cramps, ask if I was okay, that I was white as a ghost and sweating…and I’d spend time curled up in the Nurse’s office after taking an Ibuprofen. But it was normal. Every girl went through this.  Right? My family physician had wanted me to go on birth control, but just to prevent “baby accidents” from happening, which I quickly dismissed since I had no intention of having sex. Little did I know BCP may have helped with the pain…

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Poor Posture & Pain

Diagram showing poor posture

Growing up, you’re always told to “sit up straight” or “don’t slouch!”  I don’t know about you, but as an adult, I do anything but.

I spent most of this last weekend sitting at the computer wasting away on the internet, smooshed into a little ball on the chair. Either hunched over or leaning back into a curved husk.  And it got me thinking : what does bad posture do to my body? Internally. Mentally.  Physically. So, you know me : let the research begin!

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Reader’s Choice : I’m SOOO Tired

Sleeping Beauty painting by Henry Meynell Rheam

An EndoWarrior came to me with complaints of fatigue, exhaustion, and a general lack of energy.  Is it related to Endometriosis?  If so, why?  And is she the only one who has to take 2-3 naps every day? Let the research begin!

Fatigue & Endo

Fatigue is one of the many common symptoms of Endometriosis.  But why does something growing in our bodies make us tired?  No one is really sure.  Some feel that it could be our body’s coping mechanism to the pain, it could be that our body’s immune system is working on overdrive to fight our inflammation, it could be from depression, or it could be due to the mental and physical stress people with Endometriosis endure.  It could even been some deeper unforeseen medical reason that nobody has figured out yet…

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Signs & Symptoms of Endometriosis

Stop sign, caution sign, yield sign all text replaced with the Bloomin' Uterus logo

Many people born with a uterus have Endometriosis and don’t even know it.  They may be cis-gender, transgender, non-binary, or others. And there have been rare instances of men developing Endometriosis, too. I sure didn’t know what it was until I received my diagnosis. I’d never even heard of it. Endo-what?  

So what are the red flags of Endometriosis?  If I only knew about this list prior to my diagnosis, I would have gone to my doctor years ago! I met every single one of these symptoms!! Every. Single. One.

You may have Endometriosis if you have any of the following issues:

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Share your Story : Aubree

A woman with brown hair sitting cross-legged in a park

Aubree was 29 when she was diagnosed with Endometriosis.  Now 33, she lives in Colorado and has found not only acceptance of her disease, but peace.  And she’s found her healing through self-love and a natural holistic approach.  She has even written a book about her journey and her path to inner-peace and healing.

Aubree’s Journey: I suffered with extremely painful periods from the very beginning. I complained about them for years to my doctors, but nobody really paid them much attention. One of my family doctors prescribed me Ibuprofen, but this didn’t touch the pain.

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Share Your Story : Nikkia

Nikkia

Nikkia was diagnosed when she was 23 years old.  Now 31, she lives in Arizona and she and her husband are trying to conceive their second child.  Please keep them in your prayers as they are facing the difficult decision of a hysterectomy due to the complications of her illness.

Nikkia’s Journey: Endometriosis has a long history in my family. My grandmother passed away at a young age of endometrium cancer (the lining of the uterus). My mother has had two surgeries to removed fibroids to the point it didn’t help so they did a partial hysterectomy. For me I started noticing sharp pelvic pain when I was 22 . My husband and I was trying to conceive but was unsuccessful.

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Readers Choice : The Spoon Theory

A spoon in the dirt
A photo I took years ago finally has a purpose.

Christine Miserandino came up with The Spoon Theory.  It is gut-wrenching. The Spoon Theory was Christine’s way of explaining to her friend what life with Lupus is like. It’s a metaphor for our stamina and energy: any task you do during the day uses up one spoon.  You only have 12 spoons…so you must choose your tasks wisely, or else you run out of spoons…and steam.  For those of us with Endometriosis, the Spoon Theory still applies.  Any chronic illness, especially one that causes pain and fatigue, can use the spoon theory.  Continue reading