Best Endo Blogs of 2020!

Oh my goodness! I’m so honored and flabbergasted and excited:

Healthline has named Bloomin’ Uterus as one of the best Endometriosis blogs of 2020! Among some incredible sites that I respect and look up to! OH MY GOODNESS!

If you’d like to check out everyone who made the list, please go to Healthline’s article!

I know I haven’t been as active on the blog these past few months, but that doesn’t mean I’m not working on it! 🙂 I’ve got several drafted pieces, research tucked aside, and I just need to tweak ’em and post more!

Thank you, Healthline, for the honor!

Endometriosis & the Pancreas

Diagram of liver, stomach, pancreas, and gallbladder

I’m sitting here going through my very old post-surgery emails and I’ve stumbled upon one from December that made my jaw, once again, drop. A study was published in late 2018 about a woman who was discovered to have an endometrial cyst inside her pancreas…WHAT? It’s super-duper rare.

As usual, this isn’t meant to scare you. Just inform you…

As you know…I’m prone to following studies down rabbit holes and satisfy my curiosity. Today is no different! Read on, dear Reader…read on!

What & Where is the Pancreas?

I’ve often heard of the pancreas but never looked into where it was and what it does. I know it’s somewhere in my torso…but never bothered or cared to know more. But now? I’m all over it!

It’s a gland about six inches long that’s smashed in the abdominal cavity, surrounded by the liver, spleen, small intestine, stomach, and gallbladder. The pancreas aids in digestion by secreting lovely secretions affectionately called pancreatic juices. It also helps regulate blood sugar via pancreatic hormones: insulin and glucagon.

Symptoms of Pancreatic Endometriosis

From what I’ve been able to read, it appears that symptoms may include:

  • Epigastric pain (pain or discomfort below your ribs);
  • Left upper quadrant pain (the section of your torso on your left : belly button to boob and everything in between); and,
  • Unexplained weight loss.

Diagnosis & Treatment

The good news is it appears that tissue growth and/or cysts are oftentimes spotted with CT scans, MRIs, or endoscopic ultrasound. These may lead physicians to exploratory surgery. And it seems that resection (removal) of the diseased portion of the pancreas is the best option for treating pancreatic Endometriosis.

If you suffer from symptoms and want to begin steps to ensure you DON’T have pancreatic endometriosis, I do believe you’ve got quite the journey ahead. Document your symptoms, track your diet and any triggers, and begin by pursuing imaging studies (xray, CT, MRI, ultrasound, and endoscopic ultrasounds). Talk to your doctor. Do understand that it’s very rare, but there are documented cases below:

Science!

Okay, on with the studies, including the one that brought me here!

A study from 1984 was of a 36-year-old woman who had complained of epigastric pain and was being seen at a hospital in New York. Fourteen months earlier, she was hospitalized with acute pancreatitis and sonogram studies were normal. Now back in the NY hospital, she had no prior history of surgeries, no abnormal periods, her pain was not during her periods, and she didn’t have a problem with alcohol. She had right upper quadrant fullness and lower left quadrant discomfort. Palpitation of her torso was normal, as well as a rectum exam and blood tests. An x-ray showed a hiatal hernia and a distorted duodenal bulb (a portion of the small intestine that is up by the stomach). And a sonogram revealed a small buidup of calculi in her gallbladder as well as an cyst inside her pancreas. A laparatomy was performed; they couldn’t feel any stones in her gallbladder, but located the 4cm cyst in the tail of her pancreas. Piercing of the cyst showed a yellow-ish fluid. They removed part of her pancreas, as well as her gallbladder and spleen. Biopsy of the cyst proved it was lined with endometrial tissue, and hence her diagnosis of pancreatic endometriosis AND no evidence of any prior pancreatitis was found…Her symptoms subsided after her surgery. Go figure.

In 1986, a study was published of a 40-year-old woman who had recurrent left flank pain for a year and a half. When palpitated, doctors could feel a mass near her kidney, but all other physical examinations were normal. An angiography showed the upper part of her left kidney was compressed. A procedure known as an excretory urography was performed and the left side was shown to secrete less, due to a mass which had displaced her left ureter. An ultrasound led doctors to believe a cyst was present. When punctured, the cyst oozed a chocolate-colored, thick fluid. Exploratory surgery was performed and the 8cm cyst was visualized compressing the kidney. While there, her surgeons also found a cyst on her pancreas. Pathology showed the cysts were Endometriosis.

In 2000, a 47-year-old Japanese woman had complained of epigastric pain, back pain, nausea, and vomiting. A CT scan and ultrasound found a cyst on her pancreas. A surgery was performed to remove the diseased portion of her pancreas and pathology confirmed it as an endometrial cyst.

In 2002, a 21-year-old Korean woman went to the hospital because of ongoing epigastric pain and she had lost 20 pounds in one year. She had no prior surgical history, her periods were normal, and her family history was normal. A physical exam and blood tests were also normal. A CT scan showed a 4cm cyst on her pancreas. She underwent a pancreatectomy to remove the infected portion of her pancreas and the biopsy showed it positive as Endometriosis. The rest of her pancreas was normal.

A study published in 2004 was of a 34-year-old woman who was admitted to the hospital due to severe abdominal pain. She had intermittent left upper quadrant pain for the past three years. Between those painful flares, she was pain-free. A CT scan showed an 8cm mass in the tail of her pancreas and a chest x-ray showed a nodule in her right lower lung lobe near her diaphragm. She underwent a CT-guided biopsy to take a sample of the cyst on her pancreas with fine needle aspiration and they collected 100ml of dark brown fluid from the cyst. A few imaging scans later, and doctors decided to do exploratory surgery. “Small plaque-like lesions” were found on her liver and diaphragm. Other lesions were found on her spleen and they found the cyst on her pancreas. A portion of her pancreas and spleen were moved, as well as the suspicious lesions. Biopsy confirmed the cyst in the pancreas was Endometriosis. The authors of the study stress that, although rare, “a cystic lesion in the pancreas must have endometriosis in the differential diagnosis.” At least consider the option…

In 2011, a 35-year-old woman had recurrent, severe pain in her upper left abdominal quadrant. The pain had persisted for three months and an examination revealed a cyst inside her pancreas. A portion of her pancreas was removed and a biopsy showed it to be an endometrial cyst.

A July 2012 study was of a 42-year-old woman who was hospitalized due to epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed tissue changes around her pancreas as well as possible cancerous growths. Her pain resolved, but later at a follow-up exam, another CT found additional tumor growth. Physical examination and bloodwork was normal. She was referred to a local university hospital’s pancreatic team. More CT scans found swelling and tissue changes around the tail of her pancreas. Pancreatitis was suspected. An MRI led the team to suspect Endometriosis. They learned that she had a history of irregular periods (but they weren’t painful), and that her sister had Endometriosis. Since the imaging studies were not conclusive, exploratory surgery was performed by a team of gynecological and gastrointestinal surgeons. Evidece of old Endometriosis activity was noted in her Pouch of Douglas, she had a chocolate cyst on her left ovary (they removed her left ovary), and cystic tissue was found on the pancreas; which came back from pathology as Endometriosis.

In 2016, a study was published of a post-menopausal, 72-year-old woman was preliminary diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and was referred out for further testing. She had increasing abdominal pain in the upper left quadrant of her torso. And her medical history included an umbilical hernia, an appendectomy, hypertension, her gallbladder was removed, a hysterectomy, and a surgical hernia repair. “There was no known history of pancreatitis or endometriosis.” Her abdomen was bloated and tender, especially in the area of her pain. Imaging studies showed a mass on her pancreas. Pathology came back as Endometriosis, and she was symptom-free five years after her surgery.

A February 2017 study is of a 43-year-old woman who had previously been admitted to the hospital for one day of severe epigastric pain and was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. A CT scan and an endoscopic ultrasound at that time indicated a cyst on the tail-end of her pancreas. It was pierced with fine needle aspiration and brown fluid was retrieved. Fast forward to three months later and she’s at a medical clinic due to worsening abdominal pain, fatigue, diarrhea, anorexia, and having lost 15 pounds in the past three months. Although she had a previous diagnosis of Endometriosis, she did not have painful periods. Additional imaging studies confirmed the presence of the cyst and surgery found the 16cm cyst inside the tail-end of her pancreas. That section, as well as a portion of her spleen, were removed. No other evidence of Endometriosis was found. Pathological examination showed the cyst was full of “gray-green cloudy fluid” and came back as pancreatic Endometriosis.

In December of 2018, a 26-year-old woman reported abnormal periods and was hospitalized due to left abdominal pain. It hurt even when she wasn’t on her period. Her medical history only revealed that she had a prior c-section, but no history of Endometriosis or pancreatitis. A CT Scan found a 7cm cyst inside of her pancreas, which was confirmed in both an MRI and endoscopic ultrasound. A benign tumor was suspected and surgery was performed to remove part of her pancreas as well as her spleen. A biopsy was performed and it was found that she had endometrioma insider her pancreas. She underwent surgery and they removed the portion of her pancreas, as well as a bit of her spleen which was affected by the mass.

Resources:

Acta Radiologica Open (Article; Sept. 2016) – A Rare Case of Pancreatic Endometriosis in a Postmenopausal Woman and Review of the Literature

Europe PMC (Abstract; Jan. 2000) – A Case of Hemorrhagic Cyst of the Pancreas Resembling the Cystic Endometriosis.

Gastroenterology (Article; June 1984) – Endometrial Cyst of the Pancreas

HealthlineWhat’s Causing my Epigastric Pain and How Can I Find Relierf?

Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (Abstract; July 2012) – Endometriosis of the Pancreas (you may access the full article here)

Korean Journal of Internal Medicine (Article; 2002) – A Case of Pancreatic Endometrial Cyst

Pancreatic Cancer Action NetworkWhat is the Pancreas?

Southern Medical Journal (Article; Oct. 2004) – Endometriosis of the Pancreas Presenting as a Cystic Pancreatic Neoplasm with Possible Metastasis

Surgery Today (Abstract; July 2011) – Pancreatic Endometrial Cyst: Report of a Case

The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine (Article; Dec. 2018) – A Rare Case of Pancreatic Endometrial Cyst and Review of Literature

The Journal of Urology (Abstract & Article; Jan. 1986) – Pancreatic Endometriosis Presenting as Hypovascular Renal Mass (you may access the full article here)

World Journal of Gastroenterology (Article; Feb. 2017) – Pancreatic Endometrial Cyst Mimics Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm of the Pancreas

~ Again, I am a layman.  I do not hold any college degrees, nor mastery of knowledge.  Please take what I say with a grain of salt.  If curious, do your own research 
Validate my writings.  Or challenge them.  And ALWAYS feel free to consult with your physician. Always.  Yours ~ Lisa

Heating Pads & Endometriosis

Various heating pads

Recently, someone brought it to my attention that they’d heard that heating pads are bad for Endo. Now…I live with my heating pad literally attached to my body almost every first few days of my period.  So, I was taken aback by the suggestion as I find the heat soothing.  And I vowed to do some research on the theory that heat is bad for Endo…and, as usual, formulate my own opinion and share it with you.

Endometriosis News ran an article in August of 2017 highlighting the opinions of Melissa of EndoEmpowered and Aubree Deimler of Peace with Endo, and both discussed how heat may cause fascia to manipulate (or soften) and harden after it cools down once the heat is removed.  Aubree tried the heat elimination process to see how she felt, and felt a difference with her pain.  If you’d like to try, please follow her example.  Melissa interviewed Chris Toal of Azolla Health, who shared a downloadable brochure on the theories behind heat and fascia. Not only does Toal discourage the use of heating pads, but also the use of hot showers or baths.  Aubree directly linked back to Melissa’s article and interview.

What is fascia?  It’s a thin, fibrous tissue made up mostly of collagen that covers and supports tissue, such as muscles or organs.

From what I gather, the underlying theory expressed in the views of Endometriosis News, Melissa, and Aubree of why heat is bad for Endometriosis pain is that the heat, for lack of a better term, softens or melts the fascia tissue.  Once the heating pad is removed, the fascia rehardens and can make the pain worse.  This may cause adhesions to shift, form, and harden.  Aubree cites to Ida Rolf‘s theory regarding fascia and displacement with energy/heat/manipulation.

Visualize a brand new, unlit candle.  Once lit, the wax begins to melt.  Blow out the flame and the wax cools and rehardens, oftentimes in a new shape.  Or think of making gelatin: the mixture is liquid while hot and solidifies once it’s in the fridge and cooled off.

The fascia-altering theory is the only argument I have been able to find against using heating pads if you have Endometriosis…so:

Let’s find some proof to all of this…because, like I said, sometimes I live on my heating pad.

Ida’s theory that fascia tissue degrades with manipulation or energy is frowned upon by some.  It’s called the thixotropic effect, where the tissues degrade with heat or pressure, then reform upon settling.  Paul Ingraham wrote about his opinions in Feb. of 2013 and again Jan. of 2018 on thixotropic effect on PainScience.com and opines that fascia is simply “too tough” to manipulate in such a manner and states that Ms. Rolf found her theory to be “nonsense” as well.  Mr. Ingraham cited many studies and professionals to support his opinions.  You’re welcome to read both pieces (linked above and in the Resources section below).

But what if it’s not nonsense?  According to the Science of Slow Cooking (mmmmm…crock pot food…), collagen begins to break down and liquify into a gelatin at 160 degrees Fahrenheit.  Now, I’m no expert on the human body versus a meat-animal, but…how hot do heating pads get?!?

A study published in Safety Brief in 2015 ran a few experiments on heating pad created by Kaz (Model HP-110).  After running the heating pad for 120 minutes, it never exceeded 151 degrees Fahrenheit, uncovered.

Sunbeam offers a FAQ on their webpage about the temperature range of their heating pads: the low setting 110 degrees F and the high setting can get up to 160 degrees F.

Sew4Home conducted their own little science experiment with homemade microwaveable heating pads.  They compared rice, corn, and flaxseed.  After 30 seconds of heating, the rice was 140 degrees Fahrenheit, the corn was 158 degrees, and the flaxseed was 144 degrees.  Five minutes later, each had cooled:  136 (rice), 142 (corn), and 142 (flaxseed).

Hot water bottles should never be filled with boiling water (water typically boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit), due to leakage and safety concerns.  Many manufacturers of hot water bottles suggest a nice, easy-to-touch temperature; not scalding.

So, I’m not sure that heating pads (electrical, microwaveable, or hot water bottles) will get hot enough to do any liquifying damage to facia.  But, then again, I’m no expert.  And several webpages promote the use of heating pads (sometimes combined with castor oil packs) to help with adhesion, Endometriosis, pelvic, or lower back pain.

So, then I was curious: why do heating pads make my pain feel better?  Once more, I hit the internet.  And, once more, ran into a lot of Mr. Paul Ingraham’s writings and voluminous cited resources, along with other webpages.

Heat may be very soothing, it increases blood circulation to the area, it may relax tense muscles, and a 2006 study found that internal heat receptors may actually block pain signals.  So, once more, heat may be good for dealing with certain types of pain.

Again, I’m not a scientist and this is just my opinion after bouncing around the internet for several hours doing research and reading.  My conclusion?

My heating pads make me feel better…and I will not stop using them.  Am I knocking Endometriosis News, Melissa, Aubree, or Chris? Nope.  Everyone is entitled to their opinion and I value a broad perspective on things.  But, for me?  I also value the comfort that a good ol’ heating pad delivers.

What about you?  My advice? Do whatever makes you feel better.  Hot, cold, or neither.  It’s your body and you know it better than anyone.

(Updated March 27, 2019)

Resources:

Earth Clinic (Dec. 2017): Natural Remedies for Abdominal Adhesions

EndoEmpowered (Nov. 2016): Stop Using Hot Water Bottles for Endo Pain

Endometriosis News (August 2017): Should You Use Heat for Endometriosis Pain Relief?

Functional Fascia: Fascia Facts

Healthline: Treating Pain with Heat and Cold

LiveScience: (July 2006) Study: How Heating Pads Relieve Internal Pain

Merriam-Webster Dictionary: definition of fascia

My Health Alberta Ca Network: Adhesions Care Instructions

PainScience.com (Jan. 2018): Does Fascia Matter?

PainScience.com (Aug. 2016): Heat for Pain.  When and how to apply heat for therapy…and when not to!

PainScience.com (April 2017): The Great Ice vs. Heat Confusion Debacle

PainScience.com (Feb. 2013): Thixotropy is Nifty, but It’s Not Therapy

Peace with Endo: (Jan. 2017) Why I Stopped Using My Heating Pad for Endometriosis Pain

Safety Brief: (Jan. 2015) On the Safety of Heating Pads

Science of Slow Cooking: The Science of Slow Cooking

Sew4Home (Sept. 2014): Organic Fillers for Warming Pads: We Compare Rice, Corn and Flaxseed

Sunbeam: FAQ – How Hot do the Heating Pads Get?

Taber’s Medical Dictionary: definition of fascia

The Hot Water Bottle Shop: FAQS

University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignDepartment of Physics: Q&A Water Temperatures

 

~ Again, I am a layman. I do not hold any college degrees, nor mastery of knowledge. Please take what I say with a grain of salt. If curious, do your own research 😉 Validate my writings. Or challenge them. And ALWAYS feel free to consult with your physician. Always. Yours ~ Lisa

Healthline.com Asked Me to Help!

 

Untitled-1 copy
Screenshot from Healthline.com; 1/31/18

 

I’m so excited I’m going to BURST!

Earlier this month Healthline.coms staff asked if I would be interested in writing a few pieces for their site.  I’ve enjoyed the information they’ve had to offer in the past, and have been honored with a few of their blog awards, so I jumped at the chance to help!

They requested two things:

  1.  An Open Letter to their readers about my experience with Endometriosis, and any thoughts I wanted to share; and
  2. Tips & Tricks on handling painful sex that can sometimes accompany Endometriosis.

I jumped at the chance and began writing.

After I submitted the two pieces, I was then advised that Healthline.com would like to compensate me for my work.  Whua?!? You’re going to PAY me to write about Endometriosis and spreading awareness and helping support others?  …Now if you know me, you know I have this little unwritten moral code: if I make any funds dealing with Endometriosis awareness, fundraising, or the blog, I’m donating it straight to the Endometriosis Foundation of America.  I asked if they could just donate the money directly to the EFA for me; however, due to accounting reasons and stuff, they couldn’t.  So as soon as these funds hit my bank account *poof* they’ll be going straight to the EFA.

I will not, nor will I ever, profit from this damn disease.

BUT, I’m SO honored and excited and jazzed and thrilled and … excited! 😀 I wanted to share these two pieces with you.  If either of them resonates with you, please feel free to share with anyone and everyone.

The Open Letter:  Hey Girl, You Don’t Have to Live with Severe Period Pain

Painful Sex:  The Boss Babes’ Guide to Sex with Endometriosis

Thank you, Healthline staff, for this incredible opportunity for outreach and support.

If you read the articles and want to chime in your thoughts, I’d love to hear from you 🙂

Tomatoes & Endometriosis

tomatoes15-lg

During our September support group meeting, I was munching on some cherry tomatoes when one of our girls stated, “I thought tomatoes were bad for our Endo…” Damn it. Now I have to research…AND during a camping/survival skills trip in early October, I learned that the ENTIRE tomato plant (except for the tomatoes) is poisonous!  What?  How amazing is that?!?

Anyway, I digress…back to research.

My first page I found digging into tomatoes and Endometriosis introduced me to a word, “lycopene.”  What IS lycopene? It’s a carotenoid – a plant pigment – and specifically, lycopene is responsible for making fruits and veggies red…like TOMATOES.

In 2008, Dr. Tarek Dbouk announced at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine Conference that a study found lycopene could prevent or reduce the production of a protein that promoted adhesion growth. Numerous studies claim that an increase of tomatoes and tomato products in the diet reduces chances of various cancers and cardiovascular disease (although the FDA was found very little evidence to substantiate the claims).  It has been suggested that women with Endometriosis may be able to reduce their symptoms by increasing their lycopene consumption.  Although studies have suggested the lycopene may act as a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and help reduce adhesion formation, further studies are needed.

So after reading all of that, you wanna cram your fridge full of tomatoes and other red fruits and veggies right? Well…not so fast (there is always a flip side).

Tomatoes belong to a family of plants known as nightshades.  Some studies have suggested that nightshades may increase inflammation or worsen symptoms of autoimmune diseases.  Healthline published an extensive article on nightshades and various findings and theories on the effects of conditions or sensitivities.  The author also suggests (if you suspect you may have issues with nightshades) to cut ALL nightshades out of your diet for four weeks, then reintroduce them and see how you feel: the ol’ Elimination Diet.  Sounds easy?  Well, here are some fruits & veggies that are nightshades:

  • eggplants
  • goji berries
  • peppers (sweet, bell, chili, etc.)
  • potatoes (except sweet potatoes and yams)
  • tobacco
  • tomatillos
  • tomatoes

This also means that spices derived from those are included in the list of “avoid nightshades”: cayenne pepper, crushed red pepper, chili powder, and paprika.  Um…think we’re done? Nope…think again – ketchup, marinara sauce, hot sauce, and salsa all are made from nightshade components. Not an easy task avoiding nightshades.

But are tomatoes the only source of lycopene? Nope – plenty of other fruits and veggies contain lycopene:

  • apricots
  • asparagus (that’s not red!)
  • basil (again…not red!)
  • gac fruit (what is that?!?)
  • goji berry (aka wolfberries; careful…it’s a nightshade)
  • papaya
  • parsley (it’s green!)
  • pink grapefruit
  • pink guava
  • red cabbage
  • red bell peppers
  • red carrots
  • rosehips
  • sea-buckthorn
  • watermelon

A 2015 study tested 10 fruits and veggies in raw and processed forms to discover which had the highest lycopene content.  A breakdown of the tested fruits and veggies (lowest to highest lycopene quantities) in their raw forms: watermelon, asparagus, carrot, grapefruit, gac, red cabbage, sweet peppers, papaya, tomato, and pink guava.  In processed food form, the following order was determined (lowest to highest): mango juice, canned carrot juice, cherry tomato paste, watermelon juice, dried apricots, marinara sauce, sundried tomatoes, canned tomato juice, canned tomato puree, and canned tomato paste.  That being said, they concluded the study by stating, ” The appropriate dose and duration of lycopene supplementation remains to be determined.”  It’s been said that just 8 ounces of tomato juice a day can help increase the levels of lycopene in your system. But, but, but…TOMATOES…nightshades…Endometriosis…!!

Last night, Merritt Jones of Natural Harmony Reproductive Health taught a class on nutrition and Endometriosis and discussed nightshades and why they may be harmful to Endometriosis-sufferers and should be limited or avoided altogether.  But, she also stressed finding what works best for your body, your digestion, and your symptoms.

But wait! There’s more…a flipside of the flipside!  Healthline also wrote an article about nightshades and inflammation in regards to arthritis pain.  Some people with arthritis who avoided nightshades did not experience any symptom relief after eliminating nightshades, so they were encouraged to continue to eat them due to the health benefits that they provide.  The pros outweighed the cons for those individuals.  AND, Ms. Jones informed us at last night’s class that if cutting out anti-inflammatory foods does not help reduce symptoms, you may be suffering from a bit of bad gut health, possibly even leaky gut syndrome.  Always talk to your healthcare provider if things aren’t working – something else may be going on.

So now what?  Tomatoes are good for you. Tomatoes are bad for you.  “Tomayto, tomahto” – do your own research, try the elimination diet, see how you feel, and follow your gut (but do make sure your gut is healthy!).  BUT if you do want to increase your lycopene intake, there are plenty of other options (food and supplement-wise) besides tomatoes.  And, as always, please talk to your healthcare providers before starting any new supplements.

What am I gonna do?  Man, I love me some tomatoes.  I have a little carton of them on my desk right now – delicious, cherub tomatoes.  I really don’t know what I’m going to do.  So, that means I’ll likely do my best to cut them out (and other nightshades) to see if I notice a difference in how I feel – and decide after I reintroduce them back into my diet.

But what about you? What are you going to do? Or what have you already done – and did it make a difference? I’d love to hear about it…drop me a comment below.

(Updated March 27, 2019)

Resources:

Annual Review of Food Science and Technology (Manuscript; 2010) – An Update on the Health Effects of Tomato Lycopene

Canadian Medical Association Journal (Article; Sept. 2000) Tomato Lycopene and Its Role in Human Health and Chronic Diseases

Daily MailEating Tomatoes Could Help Fight a Painful Womb Condition that Affects 2 Million Women in UK

Dr. WeilTomatoes for Endometriosis?

Healthline (Article; June 2017) – Are Nightshades Bad for You?

Healthline (Article; March 2017) – Nightshade Vegetables and Inflammation: Can They Help with Arthritis Symptoms?

Journal of Basic Sciences – (Article, 2015) – Evaluation of Lycopene Contents from Various Fruits and Processed Food

Journal of the Natural Cancer Institute – (Article; July 2007) – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Evidence-Based Review for Qualified Health Claims: Tomatoes, Lycopene, and Cancer

Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons – (Article; Apr-Jun 2007) Patients with Chronic Pelvic Pain: Endometriosis or Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome?

LiveScience– (Article, Oct. 2015) – What are Carotenoids?

Livestrong – (Article; Oct. 2017) – List of Nightshade Vegetables & Fruits

~ Again, I am a layman.  I do not hold any college degrees, nor mastery of knowledge.  Please take what I say with a grain of salt.  If curious, do your own research 😉 Validate my writings.  Or challenge them.  And ALWAYS feel free to consult with your physician. Always.  Yours ~ Lisa

Endometriosis & the Appendix

Diagram of the appendix

Here I go again, once more intrigued by Endometriosis growing in odd places inside the body.  Today I’m going to focus on the appendix.  I’ve read that many Warriors have their appendix removed because physicians may confuse Endometriosis pain for the symptoms of appendicitis.  But on Tuesday an article hit my email about Endometriosis growing on the appendix…and I became obsessed.

Please remember: I don’t write this to scare you, or freak you out, or say that all of your right-sided abdominal pain is from Appendix Endo.  Take a deep breath – I like to document these things in case anyone would like to discuss it further with their healthcare providers so they may be aware during surgery.  Appendiceal Endometriosis is considered extremely rare and it is suspected that only 1-3% of all cases of Endometriosis involve the appendix.  But…knowledge is power.

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2017 Best Endometriosis Blog Award!

Badge that reads "healthline best blogs endometriosis 2017"

Oh man! Here we go again!

Healthline surprised me with naming Bloomin’ Uterus one of 2017’s Best Endometriosis Blogs!  AUGH!  I’m so excited, and honored, and proud, and grateful, and overwhelmed!

Side-by-side with the Endometriosis Foundation of America’s blog, Dr. Seckin’s blog, Endometriosis Australia’s blog, Endometriosis.org, and so many other bloggers that I admire and respect!  It’s a huge honor for us all.  And I hope that each of these blogs will help point others in the right direction for their treatment (whatever their course may be), finding answers, and bonding with other EndoWarriors.  We are a great community.

I know not everyone likes or agrees with everything I write.  And that’s okay.  We are each allowed to form our own opinions, ideas, thoughts, and paths.  But I hope that I am at least able to encourage thoughts, conversations, and support.

To scope out the other winners, please check out Heathline’s list!

Much love to you.

Lisa

Reader’s Choice : Endometrial Polyps

Tiny mushrooms growing on a log

One of our local EndoSisters has recently been diagnosed with endometrial polyps, something I know absolutely nothing about.  So what happens when I know nothing? I research!

What is a polyp?

A polyp is an abnormal overgrowth of tissue, usually a lump, bump, or stalky growth (hence the mushrooms above).  They’re most commonly found in the colon, but can be found in the uterus (known as uterine or endometrial polyps), cervix, stomach, throat, nose, and ear canal.  There can be just one polyp…or there can be lots.

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EndoInvasion : Stages

A stage with the Bloomin' Uterus logo centered on it in a spotlight
Our Uterus : center stage!

So there are four “Stages” of Endometriosis.  It’s the doctors way of categorizing the depth of the EndoInvasion in our bodies.  It was developed by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.   Diagrams of the various stages can be in an article published in Fertility & Sterility back in 1997.

I didn’t know my Stage level and had to ask my doctor.  My Endometriosis was Stage 4, the most severe it can get. Probably because it was brewing inside me undetected for nearly 2 decades. Ugly disease. (Update: As of June 6, 2019, I’ve now had a total of four excision surgeries; each one classified my illness as Stage 4).

The interesting things about Stages: the Stage Level doesn’t necessarily dictate our symptom or pain levels.  Someone with Stage 1 can have severe pain, while someone with Stage 4 may not even realize it.  Just one more mystery o’Endo.

So what are these Stages?  Here ya go:

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