Endometriosis & Perineum

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It’s the only photo I could think of that wasn’t … vulgar

Well, this was a first for me.

I’ve read numerous studies of Endometriosis developing in scar tissue after c-sections or other abdominal surgeries, but this one caught me by such surprise that I wanted to share it with you!  It’s important to any EndoSisters who may have delivered children naturally and have complaints of pain…”down there.”  Read on!

A 38-year-old woman had birthed a baby vaginally 12 years ago, undergoing an episiotomy.  Three years ago she developed pain on the right side of her vulva.  The pain increased during her periods.  Two years ago, that painful spot began to swell. And swell.  And swell until it was an inch long and an inch wide and turned into a hard, discolored bump.  None of her doctors were able to offer her answers or relief.  So, further investigation was needed.

Where was this swelling?  You know sometimes women who give natural birth have to have their (insert grimace here) vaginal openings…made wider in an effort to avoid tearing?  It’s a procedure called an episiotomy – a small incision through the muscular tissue of the vaginal opening, down the perineum toward the anus.  In 12-year-old giggle-girl terms: they slice open the gooch; the taint.  Okay, let me compose myself again…

Anyway, this poor woman had developed an inch-long/wide bump in her episiotomy scar which was painful RIGHT THERE!  Could you imagine wearing jeans? Sitting down? Even just walking? Ugh…

An MRI was taken and it was discovered that the lumpy-bumpy stretched along the perineum and was also involved with the puborectal muscles ( little sling that encircles the rectum – if you’ve seen the Squatty Potty ads on TV or Youtube, it’s the little rubberband muscle that relaxes/released your colon-goods) AND her anal sphincter.  Surgery was ordered and they excised the mass, as well as 1cm of healthy tissue surrounding the lump.  They also reconstructed her sphincter (thank goodness).  Biopsies of the tissue confirmed the suspected diagnosis of scar tissue Endometriosis.  And six months after her surgery, she was still symptom-free.  There was no prior history of Endometriosis mentioned in this article.

I was flabbergasted.  I know Endo can develop wherever and I really shouldn’t be surprised – but all the hullabaloo I’ve read about is women developing scar endometriosis after c-sections.  Just know that it can develop…um…elsewhere…even if you haven’t had a c-section

This just goes to affirm my beliefs that if you have a hard, painful bump *anywhere*, please talk to your doctor and pursue answers.

And happy Tuesday! ❤

Resources:

Babycenter All About Episiotomy

Panacea Journal of Medical Sciences – (April 2017; Article) A Rare Case: Episiotomy Scar Endometriosis with Anal Sphincter Involvement

~ Again, I am a layman.  I do not hold any college degrees, nor mastery of knowledge.  Please take what I say with a grain of salt.  If curious, do your own research 😉 Validate my writings.  Or challenge them.  And ALWAYS feel free to consult with your physician. Always.  Yours ~ Lisa

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