Share Your Story: Leidy

A woman standing in front of a grassy lawn wearing a pink sweater, gray hat, and sunglasses

Leidy lives in Germany and was 35 years old when she was told she had Endometriosis. Now 42, she would like to share her story with everyone cares to read it. A battle which literally spans the globe in search of answers, a series of numerous misdiagnoses, and Leidy is one hell of a Warrior.

Leidy’s Journey:   I am now 42 years old but since my first period, I have had problems. 

My main problem is in my bowels. Which misled my specialists to find the correct diagnosis. The only issue I had, related to my period, was irregular bleeding. 

Each month I bled during my ovulation. My period lasts sometimes more than a week. And I bled during sexual intercourse. The pain during the period was not severe and Ibuprofen usually was enough to alleviate the pain.

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Share Your Story: Tharini

blank journal
Photo by MESSALA CIULLA on Pexels.com

Tharini is 24 years old and was diagnosed with Endometriosis in 2020 and lives in Epsom in the United Kingdom. She wanted to stress with us the importance of tracking your symptoms.

Tharini’s Journey:   I was diagnosed with endo last year after suspecting for months. My symptoms include lower back pain and foot pain that really is bad. I also have classic endo symptoms like aching stomach and loss of blood each month too. I would sum up this by saying do not lose hope but merely insist on a appointment and then tests to check for symptoms that are indicative of endo.

It also helps to keep a diary of symptoms pertaining to your specific type of endo, what time of the month they occur etc as well. Never give up in other words, find a doctor who is really smart and caring at the same time.

I want to send a special Thank You out to Tharini for being brave enough to share her journey with us today!  And I agree: tracking and sharing symptoms is OH SO IMPORTANT!!    ❤ Yours, Lisa.


And if YOU would like to share your story, please let me know.  The best part about this disease is the strong network of love and support from our fellow EndoWarriors, and our friends and family, too.

Ovira: A device for menstrual pain

Ovira device in the box

As you know, from time to time we get offers to review products that manufacturers may feel are useful to our readers. I like to extend those review opportunities from time to time to other Warriors in my local support group. So, today, we’re publishing another review by Nicole. And the one condition I make when accepting a product is our reviews will be unbiased and 100% honest; no sugar-coating anything.

Ovira reached out to use with their new product, a discreet device that may help with menstrual cramps. But without further adieu, I’ll let Nicole take it away:

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Share Your Story: Kat

An IUD and scalpel with text that reads: "I have a decision to make: mirena or hysterectomy?"

Kat was diagnosed this year with Endometriosis at 47 years old.

Kat’s Journey:   Over the last 2 years my cycles that were getting very light and very spread out (I almost went 11 months) have been getting worse. My cycle is never the same… it will go 50 days one month and 35 the next. Sometimes I get the incredible cramping but no bleeding. When I do bleed I soak a tampon in 30 minutes. It has been like this for the last 6 months.

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Endometriosis & the Pancreas

Diagram of liver, stomach, pancreas, and gallbladder

I’m sitting here going through my very old post-surgery emails and I’ve stumbled upon one from December that made my jaw, once again, drop. A study was published in late 2018 about a woman who was discovered to have an endometrial cyst inside her pancreas…WHAT? It’s super-duper rare.

As usual, this isn’t meant to scare you. Just inform you…

As you know…I’m prone to following studies down rabbit holes and satisfy my curiosity. Today is no different! Read on, dear Reader…read on!

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Share Your Story: T.E.

T.E. was diagnosed with Endometriosis when she was 28 years old.  Now 31, she shares her story with us:

T.E.’s Journey: I was diagnosed with Endo around 28. I saw my gynecologist for painful sex and cyst rupture after sex and he recommended me seeing an infertility doctor for possible Endo. I saw the specialist and he said I did have chocolate cysts and suggested surgery to get a good look at what’s going on. I had the surgery; I did have lesions and my chocolate cysts were drained. I also had a low count of eggs at the time so I had to decide if I wanted to have kids now or never so I never started the pill after surgery.

Fast forward six months, I was back in pain and now till this day, I have had new symptoms arise. Hip pain and the bottom of my feet are new symptoms. I walk for a living so it’s been difficult. I still get leg pain, which is not even around the time of my period and mood swings. I also get lower back pain and severe cramps. My infertility doctor says he can’t do anything else for me so I have been trying other ways. I saw a holistic doctor and went that way and it did help, but the pain came back. I’m going to try acupuncture soon. Wish me luck!!

I want to send a special Thank You out to T.E. for being brave enough to share her personal story and struggle with us today.  Wishing you the BEST of luck with acupuncture!! You are a beautiful, brave, and strong woman.  Thank you!!!


And if YOU would like to share your story, please let me know.  The best part about this disease is the strong network of love and support from our fellow EndoWarriors, and our friends and family, too.

Yours, Lisa.

Share Your Story: Stephany

After suffering with horrible periods and cramps since 13 years old, Stephany was 31 years old when she finally received answers: her Endometriosis diagnosis.  Two years later, she shares her story with us.

Stephany’s Journey: I was 13 the first time I had a “bad cramp”. From then on they never went away & just got worse. I would double over in pain, movement in general while having a cramp just made it worse like a nerve being shocked in my abdominal area. I would just have to stay still until the cramp passed. I would ask to stay home from school during the first day or 2, and luckily a few times my grandmother let me. I tried things like Midol & other off the shelf pain meds but they didn’t do a damn thing. It was like I just ate a skittle to try to manage my cramps, no relief.

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Reader’s Choice: Pudendal Nerve Pain

A diagram of the pudendal nerve in a female human

One of our readers (who shall remain anonymous) asked if we could look into a topic: “Pudendal nerve pain-when is it endo and when is it not? Or is there even a way to know?”  So, here I go off to learn things and hopefully share a bit of that newfound knowledge.  And since this blog entry is Endometriosis-related, I’m going to keep the anatomy female (although men have a pudendal nerve and can also suffer from these symptoms).

Where’s the Pudendal Nerve?

The pudendal nerve is located back by the tailbone, and extends along the pelvic floor and around the pelvis, toward the rectal, gluteal, and clitoris areas.  There’s two: a right and a left pudendal nerve.  One or both pudendal nerves may cause issues, which we’ll get into right now!

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