My 4th Endo Excision Surgery

"Uterus & Guts," created by Ivy Denton
@deathwindchimes 

Before I get started, let me explain the image above. A talented artist by the name of Ivy Denton (@deathwindchimes) created it for me (they also created the EndoGuy and PoopChuteSnakie you’ll see below). They’re taking commissions if you’re interested in throwing ideas their way! “What is it,” you may be asking yourself. It’s a whimsical interpretation of my insides: a uterus with two cervix, no fallopian tubes (hence the band-aids and floating ovaries), and it’s accompanied by it’s new buddy: an intestine missing some pieces. I think it’s adorable! Thanks, Ivy!!


On with the good stuff! If you didn’t already know, back in July of this year Dr. Kurtulus discovered a pair of Endo lesions on my small intestine. He brought in a colo-rectal surgeon, Dr. Schultzel, to look at it and decide if we could remove it then. Unfortunately, it was deemed too deep and risky without a proper bowel prep and a future resection would take place.

On November 26, 2018, I had a tag-team surgery for my Endometriosis. Dr. Mel Kurtulus once again performed my excision surgery and Dr. Matthew Schultzel performed my bowel resection. This took place just four months after my last excision surgery. The procedure lasted about four hours and went without a hitch. I remained in the luxury resort…I mean the Prebys Cardiovascular Institute at Scripps Memorial Hospital for three nights/four days while I recovered.


The Bowel Prep

This was my very first bowel prep. Ever. And I was terrified of so many things. I’d heard horror stories about the taste of the prep, and equally horrifying tales of the aftermath.

I was prescribed Suprep, which of course my insurance refused to cover. If that ever happens to you, get a manufacturer’s coupon off of their website and bring it to your pharmacist. It certainly knocked a bit off the price for me!

Honestly, it didn’t taste that awful…kind of like a salty grape-flavored 7-up. But ugh it was still rough to get down.

35 minutes after I downed my first big dose of Suprep…and the torrential downpour had begun. Over the next 2 hours, I pooped a total of 19 times (I’m sparing you the details, but kept a detailed log; no pun intended). Most of it was liquid and sometimes I couldn’t even leave the toilet in between craziness.

My colo-rectal surgeon also had me on a regimen of ClearFast, to help not only keep me hydrated during the process but to make for a faster/easier recovery after surgery.

Then at 10pm, I took my 2nd dose of Suprep. It took about 30 minutes to take effect and over the next hour I poo’d liquid 13 times. At 11:30, I dragged myself to bed. At 4:00am, I woke up to take my prescribed ClearFast and learned that Suprep was still in command. I pooped again 5 times over the next hour. And when we got to the hospital, I poo’d liquid again twice before surgery (once in my surgery cap ‘n gown)! I was scared that the clear liquid-pooing would keep them from performing my surgery since I was obviously still voiding. Nope! The show must go on!

The Bowel Resection

After a few months of working with my insurance and getting Dr. Schultzel specially-approved for my surgery (even before he was in my insurance network), the day was here! I endured the prep and I was ready!

My Mum came with me to the hospital and my husband had to work, we met the smiling faces of hospital staff who have remembered us from previous surgeries, AND I had my favorite nurse help me during pre-op setup. Fist bumps, hugs, and cheek-kisses were exchanged all around the pre-op area as they wheeled me out of the room. Have I mentioned how much I love this hospital? They’re like family!

I digress: back to the surgery!

Previously, the endo was spotted on my terminal ileum, which is the area where the small intestine meets your large intestine ( X marks the spot on the picture below). At my request, my colo-rectal surgeon was also going to remove my appendix due to the close-proximity of Endo and the chance that it, too, may be affected. He was also going to inspect and possibly remove any portion of my large intestine that may also be Endo-laden (see the red square below). He ended up doing JUST that.

There were a total of five incisions (1 on my right side, 3 on the left, and a larger one at my bellybutton). I was given a TAP block injection while I was under anesthesia to help with my post-op pain. And in went the camera…

Dr. Schultzel spotted the Endo lesion on my terminal ileum right away, then saw more lesions on my cecum (kind of the bottom right portion of the large intestine) and near my appendix. He also saw a lot of pelvic Endometriosis, but knew Dr. Kurtulus would be handling those nasty buggers.

This is where things get exciting! When I learned I’d have my guts stapled together, I envisioned a big ol’ heavy-duty office stapler. BUT a surgical stapler, especially a robotic stapler, is waaaay cooler! It sort of cuts and seals at the same time with a row of tiny little staples. If you’re familiar with sewing, imagine a serger machine. Zip & slice! One neat little package. I have no way of knowing how many staples still reside in my guts, but I imagine a lot of little teeny ones!

If you don’t want to imagine, you don’t have to: here’s a Youtube video (not mine) of another surgeon using a robotic stapler during a surgery (fast forward to the 0:44-second mark) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSxiTZwdUFA

So, Dr. Schultzel removed my appendix, my cecum, a portion of my large intestine, my terminal ileum, and small intestine. All in all, it was a little over 7 inches (18 cm) of my guts. The stapler system was used in all areas where my guts were removed.

My small intestine was reconnected to my newly-constructed large intestine and that connection now lives over my liver, near the right of my bellybutton. Then he wrapped that little newly-formed gut-intersection in a flap of my omentum (a fancy term for a fatty, fleshy organ that sits near the stomach and is kind of like a draped apron) – imagine a little poopchute burrito or taco near my bellybutton. 🙂

Dr. Shultzel then passed the controls of the Da Vinci over to Dr. Kurtulus (see The Endo Excision below). Once Dr. K finished removing any Endo and adhesions, Dr. Schultzel continued to work his magic. He pulled out all of the cut-out bits through a hollow tube placed in my bellybutton incision (called an Alexis wound retractor), stitched, and glued me up.

Alexis Wound Retractor; photo courtesy of Applied Medical

My incisions are definitely larger than surgeries-past, but so much more was done. After reading about the Alexis Wound Retractor, now I understand why my bellybutton incision is roughly 2 inches long!


The Endo Excision

Awww, Endometriosis. It loves me so much it keeps coming back to visit. With it being just four months since my July wide-margin excision surgery, we weren’t expecting to find much, if any. Dr. Kurtulus was there to inspect under the hood just to be safe while I was already under the knife for my bowel resection. A wonderfully, perfect coordinated effort. Boy, were we in for a surprise.

He found newly-formed adhesions on my left side, which involved my left ovary and abdominal wall, more along my peritoneum lining, as well as new adhesions that had begun to smash my bladder back down. He also found Endometriosis lesions “all throughout the pelvis.” They had grown back on my right ovary, my right ovarian fossa (where the ovary hangs out), my Pouch of Douglas, the uterosacral ligaments, near my bladder, my left ovary, and the left adnexa. And, as is customary, an Endometrioma (the chocolate cyst) had formed again on my left ovary. Always my left ovary!!! Even after just four months…*sigh* But…”the rest of the pelvis and abdomen looked clear of endometriosis lesions.” Yay!

He removed all of my Endometriosis lesions with wide-margin excision. He also removed the Endometrioma (he saved my left ovary) and he cut away all of the adhesions that had formed. He also, as is our custom, performed a cystoscopy to look inside my bladder for any Endo or abnormalities: pink, healthy, and all normal! And for the first time in a few surgeries: no Endo on or around my ureters!

Everything that was removed: the gut-bits, the Endo lesions, the adhesions, and Endometrioma were all sent off to pathology. This was the longest pathology report I’ve ever received: a total of seven pages! And it confirmed the presence of microscopic Endometriosis on my appendix. I’m SO grateful the surgeons and insurance all agreed to preventatively remove it.


The Recovery

My Mum, husband, and friends who saw me after surgery said it appeared to be my easiest one yet, in terms of how I felt during recovery. I, on the other hand, felt it was my hardest.

Four days in the hospital: my Mum stayed with me every day while I was there (I love you, Mum!!), my husband would visit after work, both of my surgeons visited as often as the could, and the nursing staff were freakin’ amazing!

During my stay, I was given a cocktail of Tylenol, Gadapentin, and Celebrex to manage my pain. I was offered Tramadol (100mg), but didn’t want it since I already don’t like taking my 50mg Trammy at home. But the cocktail did well and pain was minimal. If memory serves me correctly, I threw up a few times the evening of my surgery (likely related to anesthesia) and became intimately familiar with the hospital-issued throw-up bags.

My surgeon and hospital staff encouraged me to get up and walk the halls as often as I could muster. Not only would this help keep me limber and young (Ha!), but it would help get my bowels workin’ and tootin’. Those long walks around the 5th Floor wing were fun: I stumbled across my surgeon on one of those walks, as well as my best friend, Rosie, and my husband escorted me down the halls a time or two!

I remained on a liquid diet until I farted…late the evening on my third day. Very long days of nothing but soup and jello. But that fart? Which was AWESOME because not only was my Mum’s face epic and unforgettable when I tooted, but all of the nurses were just as excited as we were, AND I was served a small meal of soft foods (diced chicken breast never tasted SO good!). Mum and I even had a laugh keepin’ track.

The next late-morning, I was able to poop (if you can call it that…I’ll spare you the details, but I hope my Mum is laughing when she reads this) and Iwas merrily discharged on Thursday, November 29, 2018.

There were bouts of the dreaded shoulder-gas pain, both at the hospital and at home. A few of them were scream-inducing memorable. And those are the worst moments I remember. Sneezes, coughs, and vomiting were equally unpleasant. As well as trying to get, and remain, comfortable for sleeping. When I got home, I mostly remained on my Tylenol pain management, with the exception of 1 Naproxen Sodium and Two Tramadol through the duration of 2018.

I was off of work for six weeks. And got a little better every day. I kept a running tally of milestones:

  • 11/28/18: Released from hospital and finally at home
  • 12/4/18: I can raise my arms above my head without feeling like I”m pulling my guts out of my incisions
  • 12/8/18: First sneeze since surgery: one sneeze, two sneezes, three sneezes!! SOOO PAINFUL!
  • 12/14/18: I can blow my nose without my guts hurting!
  • 12/17/18: I still can’t bend down and wash my feet, and it’s been 3 weeks since surgery…so I got a pedicure at a local salon. There was some disgusting dead skin!
  • 12/19/18: If I use the handrails, I can walk up the stairs like a normal! Slowly, but normal!
  • 12/20/18: I walked the entire mobile home park! It took over half an hour, but I did it!
  • 12/27/18: I drove!!!
  • 12/29/18: I lasted 10 days without needing to take a pain pill!
  • 1/3/19: I laid down on my side for just a few minutes! Soon: no more back-sleeping!
  • 1/7/19: I’m back to work!!!
  • 1/9/19: I can lay down on my stomach! Albeit for just a few minutes. But still!!
  • 1/17/19: as a fun note: bending or squatting or sitting for long periods still becomes very uncomfortable. So…I haven’t shaved my legs since before 11/26! Bwuahaha.

I cannot tell you how much better I feel since before my surgery. I haven’t had any of my pre-surgery pain. Not one! My bowel movements are (99.9% of the time) pain-free. The constant pain on the right and left sides of my lower abdomen are GONE. My December period was light and cramp-controlled with Ibuprofen. My back pain is gone. And I poop ALL the time.

And…I’m a pooping machine! I compared the first week of November poops to my January poops, both the frequency and the pain levels. My jaw hit the floor:

I now eat six small meals a day, instead of three large ones, to accommodate my new bowels. I also have severely restricted my alcohol intake. Where before I could enjoy 2 or 3 beers in a sitting, I can now only have one. Same goes for wine or cocktails. More than that and I’ve noticed I’m severely dehydrated and my gut’s not happy for days. So, I’ve become the ultimate cheap date: appetizer menu and one drink. And it’s been a marvelous trade-off.

I’m super grateful to my Mum for being with me for a week while I recovered. There’s just something so special about the healing energy of a Mum. And to my friends who came to take care of me after Mum left: thank you. ❤


The Bills!

Nobody’s favorite part…the money!! This has been my most costly surgery to date; not only because of the two surgeons involved, but the hospital stay after surgery! And my bills are still rolling in:

$224,476.41Hospital Facility Bill Insurance paid in full
$1,687Gyno Surgeon Bill Insurance paid in full
$2,082.19Pathologist Bill Insurance Payment Pending
(Pending)Colo-rectal Surgeon Bill
Insurance Payment Pending
$2,800AnesthesiologistInsurance paid in full
$2,250My co-payI paid in full
$233,295.60Total(updated 2/6/19)

Surgery Photos

Before I share all of the surgery and recovery photos, I wanted to share the photo I found the most amazing.

Back in July, Dr. K took a photo of my bowel with the 2 pink & red Endo lesions. In November, those same splotches had turned BLACK. In a matter of four months, the disease altered that much. I know that lesions come in a broad range of colors…but I didn’t realize they changed color or shape once they were formed! Nor so quickly! So, we’ll start with that! Be flabbergasted with me 🙂

But here are the rest of my surgery photos I received at my post-op appointments (click on them to enlarge):


Recovery Photos

Mum took a lot of photos while we were in the hospital (but funnily enough…none of her!). Here’s the Hospital Shenanigans:

And here’s a slideshow of my incisions from Day One to Week Seven!

If you’ve made it ALL the way to the end of today’s blog entry, you have my applause!

I’m eternally grateful to both my skilled surgeons and their staff; the insurance crew who expedited the approvals through the system; my Mum, my husband, my Seester, and my friends for not only helping me, but putting up with my grumpy-recovery BS; as well as my employers and my co-workers for allowing me to do this second surgery this year. 2018 was one hell of a ride. And this surgery could not have gone any better without each of you.

Let’s hope there’s no need for future surgeries!


Endometriosis & the Pancreas

I’m sitting here going through my very old post-surgery emails and I’ve stumbled upon one from December that made my jaw, once again, drop. A study was published in late 2018 about a woman who was discovered to have an endometrial cyst inside her pancreas…WHAT? It’s super-duper rare.

As usual, this isn’t meant to scare you. Just inform you…

As you know…I’m prone to following studies down rabbit holes and satisfy my curiosity. Today is no different! Read on, dear Reader…read on!

What & Where is the Pancreas?

I’ve often heard of the pancreas but never looked into where it was and what it does. I know it’s somewhere in my torso…but never bothered or cared to know more. But now? I’m all over it!

It’s a gland about six inches long that’s smashed in the abdominal cavity, surrounded by the liver, spleen, small intestine, stomach, and gallbladder. The pancreas aids in digestion by secreting lovely secretions affectionately called pancreatic juices. It also helps regulate blood sugar via pancreatic hormones: insulin and glucagon.

Symptoms of Pancreatic Endometriosis

From what I’ve been able to read, it appears that symptoms may include:

  • Epigastric pain (pain or discomfort below your ribs);
  • Left upper quadrant pain (the section of your torso on your left : belly button to boob and everything in between); and,
  • Unexplained weight loss.

Diagnosis & Treatment

The good news is it appears that tissue growth and/or cysts are oftentimes spotted with CT scans, MRIs, or endoscopic ultrasound. These may lead physicians to exploratory surgery. And it seems that resection (removal) of the diseased portion of the pancreas is the best option for treating pancreatic Endometriosis.

If you suffer from symptoms and want to begin steps to ensure you DON’T have pancreatic endometriosis, I do believe you’ve got quite the journey ahead. Document your symptoms, track your diet and any triggers, and begin by pursuing imaging studies (xray, CT, MRI, ultrasound, and endoscopic ultrasounds). Talk to your doctor. Do understand that it’s very rare, but there are documented cases below:

Science!

Okay, on with the studies, including the one that brought me here!

A study from 1984 was of a 36-year-old woman who had complained of epigastric pain and was being seen at a hospital in New York. Fourteen months earlier, she was hospitalized with acute pancreatitis and sonogram studies were normal. Now back in the NY hospital, she had no prior history of surgeries, no abnormal periods, her pain was not during her periods, and she didn’t have a problem with alcohol. She had right upper quadrant fullness and lower left quadrant discomfort. Palpitation of her torso was normal, as well as a rectum exam and blood tests. An x-ray showed a hiatal hernia and a distorted duodenal bulb (a portion of the small intestine that is up by the stomach). And a sonogram revealed a small buidup of calculi in her gallbladder as well as an cyst inside her pancreas. A laparatomy was performed; they couldn’t feel any stones in her gallbladder, but located the 4cm cyst in the tail of her pancreas. Piercing of the cyst showed a yellow-ish fluid. They removed part of her pancreas, as well as her gallbladder and spleen. Biopsy of the cyst proved it was lined with endometrial tissue, and hence her diagnosis of pancreatic endometriosis AND no evidence of any prior pancreatitis was found…Her symptoms subsided after her surgery. Go figure.

In 1986, a study was published of a 40-year-old woman who had recurrent left flank pain for a year and a half. When palpitated, doctors could feel a mass near her kidney, but all other physical examinations were normal. An angiography showed the upper part of her left kidney was compressed. A procedure known as an excretory urography was performed and the left side was shown to secrete less, due to a mass which had displaced her left ureter. An ultrasound led doctors to believe a cyst was present. When punctured, the cyst oozed a chocolate-colored, thick fluid. Exploratory surgery was performed and the 8cm cyst was visualized compressing the kidney. While there, her surgeons also found a cyst on her pancreas. Pathology showed the cysts were Endometriosis.

In 2000, a 47-year-old Japanese woman had complained of epigastric pain, back pain, nausea, and vomiting. A CT scan and ultrasound found a cyst on her pancreas. A surgery was performed to remove the diseased portion of her pancreas and pathology confirmed it as an endometrial cyst.

In 2002, a 21-year-old Korean woman went to the hospital because of ongoing epigastric pain and she had lost 20 pounds in one year. She had no prior surgical history, her periods were normal, and her family history was normal. A physical exam and blood tests were also normal. A CT scan showed a 4cm cyst on her pancreas. She underwent a pancreatectomy to remove the infected portion of her pancreas and the biopsy showed it positive as Endometriosis. The rest of her pancreas was normal.

A study published in 2004 was of a 34-year-old woman who was admitted to the hospital due to severe abdominal pain. She had intermittent left upper quadrant pain for the past three years. Between those painful flares, she was pain-free. A CT scan showed an 8cm mass in the tail of her pancreas and a chest x-ray showed a nodule in her right lower lung lobe near her diaphragm. She underwent a CT-guided biopsy to take a sample of the cyst on her pancreas with fine needle aspiration and they collected 100ml of dark brown fluid from the cyst. A few imaging scans later, and doctors decided to do exploratory surgery. “Small plaque-like lesions” were found on her liver and diaphragm. Other lesions were found on her spleen and they found the cyst on her pancreas. A portion of her pancreas and spleen were moved, as well as the suspicious lesions. Biopsy confirmed the cyst in the pancreas was Endometriosis. The authors of the study stress that, although rare, “a cystic lesion in the pancreas must have endometriosis in the differential diagnosis.” At least consider the option…

In 2011, a 35-year-old woman had recurrent, severe pain in her upper left abdominal quadrant. The pain had persisted for three months and an examination revealed a cyst inside her pancreas. A portion of her pancreas was removed and a biopsy showed it to be an endometrial cyst.

A July 2012 study was of a 42-year-old woman who was hospitalized due to epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed tissue changes around her pancreas as well as possible cancerous growths. Her pain resolved, but later at a follow-up exam, another CT found additional tumor growth. Physical examination and bloodwork was normal. She was referred to a local university hospital’s pancreatic team. More CT scans found swelling and tissue changes around the tail of her pancreas. Pancreatitis was suspected. An MRI led the team to suspect Endometriosis. They learned that she had a history of irregular periods (but they weren’t painful), and that her sister had Endometriosis. Since the imaging studies were not conclusive, exploratory surgery was performed by a team of gynecological and gastrointestinal surgeons. Evidece of old Endometriosis activity was noted in her Pouch of Douglas, she had a chocolate cyst on her left ovary (they removed her left ovary), and cystic tissue was found on the pancreas; which came back from pathology as Endometriosis.

In 2016, a study was published of a post-menopausal, 72-year-old woman was preliminary diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and was referred out for further testing. She had increasing abdominal pain in the upper left quadrant of her torso. And her medical history included an umbilical hernia, an appendectomy, hypertension, her gallbladder was removed, a hysterectomy, and a surgical hernia repair. “There was no known history of pancreatitis or endometriosis.” Her abdomen was bloated and tender, especially in the area of her pain. Imaging studies showed a mass on her pancreas. Pathology came back as Endometriosis, and she was symptom-free five years after her surgery.

A February 2017 study is of a 43-year-old woman who had previously been admitted to the hospital for one day of severe epigastric pain and was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. A CT scan and an endoscopic ultrasound at that time indicated a cyst on the tail-end of her pancreas. It was pierced with fine needle aspiration and brown fluid was retrieved. Fast forward to three months later and she’s at a medical clinic due to worsening abdominal pain, fatigue, diarrhea, anorexia, and having lost 15 pounds in the past three months. Although she had a previous diagnosis of Endometriosis, she did not have painful periods. Additional imaging studies confirmed the presence of the cyst and surgery found the 16cm cyst inside the tail-end of her pancreas. That section, as well as a portion of her spleen, were removed. No other evidence of Endometriosis was found. Pathological examination showed the cyst was full of “gray-green cloudy fluid” and came back as pancreatic Endometriosis.

In December of 2018, a 26-year-old woman reported abnormal periods and was hospitalized due to left abdominal pain. It hurt even when she wasn’t on her period. Her medical history only revealed that she had a prior c-section, but no history of Endometriosis or pancreatitis. A CT Scan found a 7cm cyst inside of her pancreas, which was confirmed in both an MRI and endoscopic ultrasound. A benign tumor was suspected and surgery was performed to remove part of her pancreas as well as her spleen. A biopsy was performed and it was found that she had endometrioma insider her pancreas. She underwent surgery and they removed the portion of her pancreas, as well as a bit of her spleen which was affected by the mass.

Resources:

Acta Radiologica Open (Article; Sept. 2016) – A Rare Case of Pancreatic Endometriosis in a Postmenopausal Woman and Review of the Literature

Europe PMC (Abstract; Jan. 2000) – A Case of Hemorrhagic Cyst of the Pancreas Resembling the Cystic Endometriosis.

Gastroenterology (Article; June 1984) – Endometrial Cyst of the Pancreas

HealthlineWhat’s Causing my Epigastric Pain and How Can I Find Relierf?

Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (Abstract; July 2012) – Endometriosis of the Pancreas (you may access the full article here)

Korean Journal of Internal Medicine (Article; 2002) – A Case of Pancreatic Endometrial Cyst

Pancreatic Cancer Action NetworkWhat is the Pancreas?

Southern Medical Journal (Article; Oct. 2004) – Endometriosis of the Pancreas Presenting as a Cystic Pancreatic Neoplasm with Possible Metastasis

Surgery Today (Abstract; July 2011) – Pancreatic Endometrial Cyst: Report of a Case

The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine (Article; Dec. 2018) – A Rare Case of Pancreatic Endometrial Cyst and Review of Literature

The Journal of Urology (Abstract & Article; Jan. 1986) – Pancreatic Endometriosis Presenting as Hypovascular Renal Mass (you may access the full article here)

World Journal of Gastroenterology (Article; Feb. 2017) – Pancreatic Endometrial Cyst Mimics Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm of the Pancreas

~ Again, I am a layman.  I do not hold any college degrees, nor mastery of knowledge.  Please take what I say with a grain of salt.  If curious, do your own research 
Validate my writings.  Or challenge them.  And ALWAYS feel free to consult with your physician. Always.  Yours ~ Lisa

Pain & Poops: Then & Now

Well, here we are in 2019 and I’m starting my blog off talking about poop…Why? Because I’m SUPER excited to share with you how different my bowels (and pain levels) have been since my recent bowel resection and Endometriosis excision surgery.

If you weren’t aware, I underwent a bowel resection to remove deep-infiltrating Endometriosis from my small intestine. I’m waiting on a final surgery report before I blog about the specifics, so please be patient. Hopefully in a few weeks.

Until then, embrace this discovery with me! Here’s my pain journal summary for November of 2018:

And here’s my pain journal summary for January of 2019:

I went one step further and compared my bowel movements and their pain levels for the first eight days of November and of January! The difference is…staggering!

Look how numbers have completely shifted!!! I was flabbergasted when I did the comparison! I mean, I’ve obviously noticed a huge difference in my quality-of-bathroom-life, but wasn’t expecting THIS!

If I ever needed any sort of reassurance that my bowel resection and Endometriosis excision surgeries were the right call, this is it. Not that I needed that validation. And am so grateful to Dr. Mel Kurtulus and Dr. Matthew Schultzel for their expertise, compassion, and friendship.

But I was SO excited about the difference that I wanted to share it with you…And bring in the New Year with…poop-talk.

Stay tuned. I’ll be blogging full-force once again now that I can sit at a computer for longer periods of time. And I cannot wait to share with you the details of my last surgery and the findings.

Be well. I’ve missed you Readers. And I’m so pleased to be back in the saddle, so to speak.

The Bowel Resection is Coming!

bowel3
The red circle is the approximate area where my Endo is

If you’re one of my dedicated readers, you’ll remember that I had my third Endometriosis excision surgery on July 18th of this year.  You may remember that during that surgery it was discovered that I had a few big ol’ chunky Endo lesions on my bowels (where my small intestine and large intestine meet) that couldn’t be superficially removed.  A colo-rectal surgeon was brought into my surgery and advised that a bowel resection should take place.

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The only problems?

  1. I hadn’t prepped for a bowel resection (oh man, it’s a whole process for the few days leading up to surgery);
  2. The colo-rectal surgeon wasn’t in my insurance network.

The plan?  That surgeon was going to apply to become a member of my network and I’d have my bowel surgery with him as soon as everything was legit.  I met with the colo-rectal surgeon on August 8th for a consultation (oddly enough covered by my insurance since he poked his head into my surgery) and had a discussion of our future plans.

I was told in August that the network acceptance process could take anywhere from one to three months.  So, I sat patiently…for a while.

A month passed.  Then I called my insurance company to see if there was anything they needed from me to speed along the process.  Nope.  Then I called my colo-rectal surgeon’s office to ask the same question.  Nope.  Big fat nopes all the way around.

So I waited another month and then googled my medical group assigned by my insurance company.  On their webpage was the name and telephone number of the Director of Networking – the person to whom inquiries were to be made if you were a physician looking to join the medical group.

So what did I do? I called and left a voicemail message.  A week later, I left a second message.  And a week after that, I left a message with her secretary.

The day I left my third message…she called me back. The Director! I don’t know what I expected, but certainly not what happened next.

She apologized for not calling me back sooner but stated she was having my medical history and records pulled to review.  She found that there was no mention of any pending referral or need for a bowel resection; which wasn’t unheard of since the surgeon wasn’t (yet) an in-network physician.  BUT Dr. Schutzel (my soon-to-be-colo-rectal surgeon) likely wouldn’t be approved for another three months. Early 2019!  I wanted to cry.

I briefly filled her in. Well, that’s a flat-out lie – you know I can’t do anything “briefly.” I mean, look at this blog entry already!  Anyway…she heard me out. All of it.  And offered a suggestion:  have my gyno-surgeon put together a written request explaining my need for a bowel resection and why we wanted it to be this particular out-of-network surgeon (rather than one of the four already in-network).  Then needed to tack on a copy of my July op report, and the Directory may…and I stress the word may…be able to get a one-time-only approval to have the out-of-network (aka yet-to-be-approved) surgeon covered by my insurance to do my surgery.

I gushed my appreciation and thank yous to her and hopped on the phone with my gyno’s office.  They prepped the letter the next day and sent it off!  A few days later: *abracadabra* I get a phone call (which I missed) and listened to in my voicemail.

It was the Director of Marketing…calling me after hours to let me know that the request had been APPROVED and the next step was to coordinate the surgery date!

OMGOMGOMG

She did it!! We did it! But I never would have known it was possible if it weren’t for her taking the time to review my records, listen to my tale, and offer the suggestion!

Literally less than a week from the day we spoke to the day she called to let me know it was approved!  I’m so grateful to her and my gyno’s office!

The following morning, I called the colo-rectal surgeon’s office to see if they needed any information from me.  By lunchtime the same day…everything was all set up:

My bowel resection is scheduled for Monday, November 26, 2018, at 7:15 in the morning!

And to make things even better?

  • It will be a robotic-assisted laparoscopy, using the DaVinci system (which is what’s been used for my three prior laparoscopies); Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnd…
  • Dr. Kurtulus, my Endometriosis excision surgeon (and gyno and incredible human being) will be scrubbed in and at-the-ready to take a peek under the hood to look to see how I’m doing since my July surgery! And to excise any Endo they may spot along the way!

The double-whammy!!

I’m so comforted by the fact that my medical care team fought for this to be approved and scheduled so quickly.  But the super-duper comforting thought?  Dr. Kurtulus, my gyno and my surgeon, made himself available (and insisted on being present) for my colo-rectal surgery.  And influenced the decision for the surgery to be robotic-assisted.

And…this entire endeavor is a huge reminder on why we should be persistent and self-advocate.

Now here’s my question to you gals and guys:  If you’ve ever had a bowel resection, do you have any tips for surgery prep, recovery, or diet?  I have my pre-op packet and I’m sure I’ll receive a whole slew of post-op instructions…but I also like to hear your experiences and suggestions.   If so, drop me a comment below! Please!!

I’m so excited. So ready.  So appreciative!

 

 

July 2018 Surgery Recovery

Lisa Howard - Resilience
Dr. Mel Kurtulus and I before heading in. Photo courtesy of Brandy Sebastian https://www.brandysebastian.com/

As you may know, I like to take extensive notes during my recovery from my Endo surgeries. This helps me better be prepared in case I have another one – just to get a sense of what was normal and what I can expect next time. And who knows – it may help you…or someone you know.

A good friend of mine, Brandie, typed up my chicken-scratch notes. (Thank you BRANDIE!) They can be read here. BUT, the “cliff notes” version is below:

DAY ONE (July 18, 2018, took 1 Percocet, 1 Zofran, 2 Gas-X): We got home from the hospital around 7:00 p.m. I don’t remember any of the ride home, which is probably good because it was freeway rush hour and probably wasn’t very pleasant. The first thing I did inside was pop a throat lozenge. My poor throat was sooore and tender. Then had a bowl of bone broth. My lower stomach pain was a 3 out of 10, and my belly button incision pain was a 5 out of 10.

At around 8pm, I tried to sit down for the first time. That tell-tale shoulder pain began to creep up with a vengeance (7 out of 10) and I only sat for 3 minutes. Well, that was a waste. I needed help getting up and down. I knew I’d have to sit again or lay down…but not yet. I popped a Percocet, a Zofran, and a Gas-X.

By 8:30, I had my first pee since I got home. It hurt soooooo much (9/10), but I figured that pain was likely because my bits were still tender from the catheter. By 9pm, I tried sitting on the couch again: no luck. Shoulder pain was a 9/10 and gave up and walked for the next 20 minutes. Then tried to lay down (propped up on pillows), but the shoulder pain flew back up to a 9 out of 10. Did a lot of walking and breathing. By this time, my incision pain was a 2/10 and my lower back pain was a 1/10. I just wanted to sleep, though…

By 9:35, we tried laying down again propped up by even more pillows. The discomfort was minimal. By 10:15pm, I was awake and had to walk around for an hour. I had to pee before going back to bed (again, urination pain 9/10), then I was overcome by nausea. Mom helped me on my hands and knees and I vomited (pain 2/10). I believe my Percocet pill from 2 hours earlier was still floating around in my stomach because my puke was a beautiful shade of blue. At 11:45pm, mom helped me back into bed, but I couldn’t fall asleep until 12:20-ish.

DAY TWO (Fiber; took 2 Gas-X):

Incision pain 2 – 6/10 (10/10 when struggled to get out of bed)

Shoulder/CO2 Gas pain 3 – 10/10

Lower abdominal pain 2 – 9/10

Lower rib pain 1 – 4/10

Lower back 1 – 4/10

Lower ab pain near right hip 2 – 8/10

Pain while urinating 1 – 6/10

Woke up nearly every hour still…poor Jim and Mom. And needed help getting on and off the toilet.

Was still passing some clots throughout the day.

Nothing to eat except bone broth and crackers.

Memorable Moments:

At 1:20am, I woke back up stiff and needing to walk. Dragged my husband out of bed to help me get out of bed and proceeded to walk around the house for an hour. Jim went back to bed. And Mom was in and out of sleep as I cruised around the living room using the walker. When I went to go back to bed, the shoulder pain came back a 10/10. Mom and Jim had to help me (panicked) out of bed and I had to calm down before we tried to reposition and go back to sleep. At 2:40am, we did just that. I slept off and on until 7:15am.

At 3:55pm, my first FART!

At 4:37pm, I can lift my leg higher than the bah tub rim!! I couldn’t do that earlier!

DAY THREE (Purelax; took 1 Gas-X; 1 Naproxen Sodium):

Incision pain 2 – 3/10

Lower abdominal pain 3 – 9/10

Lower back 1 – 8/10

Pain while urinating 1/10

Pain while farting 1/10

Was able to sleep for a few hours in a row before waking up throughout the night.

Ate soup and crackers. Snacked on a pickle. Small bowl of ice cream (I mean…like 2 small spoonfuls)

No shoulder/gas pain today!

Memorable moments:

7:20am, my first poop!!!!!

8:50am, although I still need help getting on and off the toilet, I was able to (carefully) pull up my panties by myself today!

12:58pm, was able to get off of the toilet by myself! But I still needed help getting down onto it.

1:01pm…oh dear god…the Enema Story. TEAM POOP! Rosie and Erin helped me. And let’s just say by sheer force of necessity, I was able to get myself onto and off of the toilet by myself…Needed the enema due to severe and constant lower ab cramping and figured it was poop. Yep…there was LOTS of poop. Throughout the day, continued to get on and off the toilet by myself! PROGRESS!

4:50pm, was able to slowly and gently walk down the stairs to check the mail with Rosie and Erin! One step at a time.

DAY FOUR (Purelax; 1 Naproxen Sodium):

Incision pain 1 – 6/10

Lower abdominal pain 2 – 6/10

Lower ab pain near left hip 7 – 9/10

Pain while urinating 1 – 2/10

Pain while farting 3/10

Still needed help getting in and out of bed.

Ate soup with crackers. Snacked on cracker. Nachos for dinner!

Memorable Moments:

10:10am, got into the shower by myself!!! FREEDOM!

4:00pm, getting better with the steps outside! Still one at a time, though.

10:00pm, FINALLY laid down flat to sleep. YES!! No pain. Although I did get myself out of bed alone…don’t do that again. Not yet.

DAY FIVE (Purelax):

Incision pain 2 – 6/10

Lower abdominal pain 2 – 5/10

Lower ab pain near right hip 2/10

Ate tomato soup with crackers. Snacked on watermelon, blueberries, dolma, and pickle. Chicken balti pie for dinner.

Memorable moments:

12:55am, got up out of bed alone to go pee! Kind of waddle around like a turtle on its back, but it works.

10:10am, got dressed in REAL clothes! Skirt, tank top, and brushed my hair!

6:50pm, Jim and I went for a walk around our mobile home park for a few blocks. It was marvelous to get out of the house. Slow going. Didn’t get far.

8:50pm, pooped again! No enema needed! And no pain!

DAY SIX (Started my period! Fiber; 2 Ibuprofen):

Incision pain 2 – 3/10

Lower abdominal pain 2 – 7/10

Lower back pain 3 – 5/10

Ate miso broth. Snacked on watermelon, popcorn, apple with peanut butter, pickles, tortillas. Dinner was a pork and (very little) cheese. Yep, my appetite is BACK!

Memorable Moments:

5:26am, woke up thinking I peed the bed. Nope, just started my Ninja Period.

6:20am, BIG poop with no pain! Yep, I’m back, baby!

9:00pm, another short walk around the park with my husband.

DAY SEVEN (Fiber):

Incision pain 2 – 6/10

Lower abdominal pain 3 – 6/10

Lower ab pain near right hip 3 – 6/10

Pain while urinating 1/10

Pain while farting

Pain while pooping 5/10

Ate broth and soup. Snacked on popcorn. Dinner was fettuccine alfredo with shrimp.

Memorable moments:

I can bend over!!!

Lower left window band-aid came off! Steri-strips still in place. Looks good!

7:00pm, rode in car to go to dinner. Speed bumps and potholes hurt my lower stomach and incisions (4/10). Had to walk around the restaurant while waiting for dinner since sitting too long hurt.

DAY EIGHT (Fiber; 2 Ibuprofen): – it’s been one week since surgery!

Incision pain 2 – 8/10

Lower abdominal pain 2 – 7/10

Lower ab pain near right hip 5 – 7/10

Ate miso broth and leftover pasta. Snacked on popcorn, dried apricots, tortillas.

Memorable Moments:

6:50am, Baku walked on my stomach. Damn cat. All incision pain 7/10.

2:15pm, I can get in and out of bed easier by myself.

11:30pm, right incision pain was an 8 out of 10 and kept me awake until 1:00 a.m.

DAY NINE (Fiber; 2 Ibuprofen):

Incision pain 2 – 3/10

Lower ab pain near right hip 2 – 3/10

Pain under left rib 2/10

Ate soup & crackers, baked beans. Snacked on Hershey Kisses. Orange chicken for dinner.

Memorable Moments:

6:12pm, can still only sit upright for 10 minutes before incision pain is a 6 – 8 out of 10.

8:10pm, went for a 20 minute walk around the park with Jim. No pain!

DAY 10 (Fiber; 2 Ibuprofen):

Incision pain 2 – 7/10

Lower abdominal pain 1 – 4/10

Pain while urinating 1 – 2/10

Pain while farting 2/10

Pain while pooping 2/10

Ate scrambled eggs with cheese, soup, leftover orange chicken. Snacked on kettle corn.

Memorable Moments:

8:15am, Able to wash my calves for the first time in the shower! And I was able to blow-dry my hair! Lost left incision band-aid in the shower. Steri-strips are in place. And my belly is much less bloated!

9:00am, still can only sit upright for 10 minutes without pain.

7:00pm, walked around the grocery store for an hour with Jim. He did all the heavy lifting, but I’m exhausted.

DAY 11 (Fiber; 4 Ibuprofen):

Incision pain 2 – 6/10

Lower abdominal pain 2 – 6/10

Pain by right lower ab near hip 2 – 5/10

Pain while urinating 2/10

Pain while pooping 2/10

Ate eggs, corn beef hash, toast. Snacked on a plout and cherries. Snacked on kettle corn.

DAY 12:

Incision pain 2 – 6/10

Lower abdominal pain 2 – 5/10

Pain while urinating 8/10

Pain by right lower ab near hip 2/10

Ate rolled tacos.

Memorable moments:

Went thrift store shopping with Jim. Exhausted and napped for 2.5 hours afterward.

DAY 13 (2 Ibuprofen):

Lower abdominal pain 1 – 5/10

Pain by right lower ab near hip 5 – 9/10

Pain while pooping 1/10

Ate fried egg sandwich. Snacked on cherries, a pluot, watermelon, and cherry tomatoes. Dinner was cauliflower, beans, corn & cheese burrito with salsa.

Memorable Moments:

Spent 2.5 hours at the library. Too much sitting on hard chairs caused a lot of pain! And the Lyft ride was brutally bumpy.

DAY 14 (Fiber):

Incision pain 2/10

Pain by right lower ab near hip 1 – 3/10

Ate nachos (with very little cheese). Snacked on an apple with peanut butter. Dinner was yellow curry with chicken and rice, golden shrimp, and crab rangoons.

Memorable Moments:

Only woke up once during the night to go pee!

DAY 15:

Incision pain 2 – 7/10

Lower abdominal pain 3/10

Pain by right lower ab near hip 1 – 3/10

Lower back pain 1/10

Ate sushi.

DAY 16:

Incision pain 2/10

Pain by right lower ab near hip 1 – 3/10

Ate 2 eggs, french toast, and bacon. Lunch was a baked potato with sour cream and chives.

Memorable Moments:

Lost a few Steri-Strips today! Looks good.
Ran errands with brother in law: Trader Joe’s and Sprouts and Smart&Final. Minimal discomfort but exhausted. I didn’t do any heavy lifting.

Drank 3 glasses of pomegranate champagne. My first alcohol since 2 weeks before surgery!

Jim and I enjoyed a little bit of foreplay and “just the tip.” Didn’t penetrate too much and it was a lot of fun. No pain!!

DAY 17 (2 Ibuprofen):

Incision pain 1 – 4/10

Lower abdominal pain 3/10

Pain by right lower ab near hip 2 – 4/10

Pain while pooping 3/10

Lower back pain 1/10

Lower right rib pain 4/10

Ate leftover yellow curry. Snacked on a pluot. Dinner was a chicken breast sandwich.

Memorable Moments:

Vacuumed, did laundry, and changed the cat litter. It was exhausting, but I took it slow and easy and didn’t overdo anything. But…by looking at the cumulative pain scores above, I can tell I overdid it. Crap.

DAY 18 (2 Ibuprofen):

Incision pain 2/10

Lower abdominal pain 2/10

Ate two waffles with fake butter and real maple syrup.

Ate Indian food for dinner.

Memorable moments:

Enjoyed 3 glasses of white wine. And it looks like my body recovered well from yesterday’s chores.

DAY 19 (Took 2 Ibuprofen):

Incision pain 3/10

Lower abdominal pain 3 – 8/10

Pain by right lower ab near hip

Pain while pooping

Lower back pain 3/10

Ate 2 waffles, drank three glasses (small) sangria, 1 glass wine, lots of water. Bean guacamole chips, chicken sandwich, pickles, chocolate chip cookie, lentil salad.

Memorable Moments:

Today was our Endo Support Appreciation BBQ! It was WONDERFUL to see everyone, to meet their support, and enjoy their company. I’m tired, though!

Lost another Steri-Strip!

And on DAY 20: August 6, 2018, I returned to work. It was my first time driving since surgery. And it was tough. I also had my post-op appointment that day. Dr. Kurtulus removed all of my Steri-strips and everything continues to heal well.

Today is August 27, 2018, and it still hurts to sit at the computer for too long. I have to get up and stretch/walk several times during the work day.

My advice if you’ve got a surgery recovery to look forward to? Take one day at a time. ASK FOR HELP! And listen to your body.

Ways to Better Prepare for Anesthesia

Untitled-1 copy

My mum recently asked me to look into ways we EndoWarriors may better prepare our bodies to accept, and recover, from anesthesia of our surgeries.

For my July surgery, I cut out alcohol the second I knew I had my confirmed surgery date and waited another two weeks before having my first sip.  So, I went a month without any booze.  Why?  Just because I thought it would be nice to pamper my liver in the hopes that my body would handle things a bit easier…or smoothly…or whatever.  But did I do any research? Nope.  So, now here comes the research.

Medications, Vitamins, Herbs, Recreational Drugs

This is VERY important so I will begin with this statement.  Some medications (including birth control), drugs, vitamins,  and supplements may interfere with the efficacy and processes of anesthesia.  Please be sure to give a thorough list to your doctor of everything you’re taking the moment you learn you have a surgery date.  Your physician may have you stop taking some of these immediately.  Others, you may be instructed to stop taking a few weeks, days, or hours before surgery.

One study stated that oral contraceptives should be discontinued six weeks before surgery due to an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (blood clots).

However, if you are interested in a homeopathic route after surgery to strengthen your body there are many supplements that are touted to boost the liver’s abilities and flush kidneys, etc.  Do your research! And…talk to your doctor before starting any supplements.

Smoking

If you smoke, try to stop smoking as soon you hear you have a surgery date.  This could be a month or more in advance.  Too much?  Try to cut out smoking at least two weeks before surgery.  If you can’t cut it cold turkey that far in advance, try hard to at least abstain from smoking a few days before your surgery.  It will alleviate a greater potential for breathing problems or complications while under anesthesia.

Booze

Alcohol may also interfere with anesthesia as well as lead to excessive bleeding during surgery.  Health24 recommends cutting out all alcohol at least a week before surgery, longer if you’re a “heavy drinker.”  And you want to keep the liver functioning at full-capacity after surgery, so avoid alcohol a week or two later.

Food

Omitting meat and dairy products before and immediately after a surgery may help with your body’s recovery.  Certain foods can cause inflammation and discomfort.  And, according to some studies, people who did not consume dairy prior to colo-rectal surgeries had a faster recovery than those who did.  A healthy diet of fiber can keep the blood from clotting, which may minimize the risk of clots occurring after surgery.  A high-fiber diet will also keep your innards a well-lubed & poopin’ machine.

In 1993, mice were given a high-fat diet for three weeks before surgery, some mice were not, and other mice were switched from a high-fat diet to a low-fat diet.  Fatty-tissue chemicals change during surgery.  These same chemicals “talk” to organs inside our body.  During surgery, that fatty tissue…and those chemicals…are traumatized, just like any other flesh being cut into.  The study found that the mice who had the low-fat diet had fewer changes in their fatty-tissue-chemical-balance than the fatty-diet mice.  It suggests that a low-fat diet before surgery may aid in recovery because of the potential of minimalized trauma to that tissue.

And a study in 1998 found that potatoes (and fresh eggplant) may make it harder for the body to break down and eliminate any lingering effects of anesthesia.  Potatoes and fresh eggplant may contain a chemical called solonaceous glycoalkaloids (SGAs) – ever cut up a potato and found green inside? That’s evidence of SGAs.  SGAs are usually found in the stems, leaves, and sprouts, but may make their way into the edible part through damage or light exposure.  The broken down layman version of the article?  Even a tiny amount of SGAs in your system can cause a delay in the body’s ability to recover from anesthetic compounds.

Drink Your Water!

Staying hydrated, before (not the morning of, unfortunately) and after surgery is always a healthy decision.  But it will also help your body operate at optimal capacity.  So, drink up.  Keep those liver and kidneys happy and healthy!

*

So what did I learn today? Probably the same things you did.  And when I do have future surgeries, I’ll:

  • Immediately talk to my doctor about my medications, vitamins, supplements, etc. to see if I need to stop anything – and the timeline to do so;
  • Do the same thing I did with alcohol that I did this last surgery: cut it out a few weeks before and after;
  • Try to better follow my anti-inflammatory diet (NO CHEEEEEESE!) and steer clear of delicious potatoes a few weeks before surgery;
  • Continue to drink lots of water.  Seriously, it’s the only thing I drink these days, besides wine and beer (haha).

What about you?  Do you do something to prepare your body for surgery and recovery? Share below. I’d love to hear it.

Resources:

American Society of Anesthesiologists Preparing for Surgery Checklist

Australian Society of AnaesthetistsPreparing for Your Anaesthetic

BBC NewsGas, Injection or Potato?

California Society of AnesthesiologistsFive Tips to Help Your Patients Prepare for Anesthesia and Surgery

California Society of AnesthesiologistsTen Questions to Ask Before Anesthesiology

Health 24Diet Preparations Before Surgery

Health24Prepare Yourself Mentally and Physically Before Surgery

Hippokratia Quarterly Medical Journal – (Article; Jan. 2007) – Preoperative Evaluation and Preparation for Anesthesia and Surgery

Juicing for HealthAnesthesia Side Effects and How to Flush Out Toxins Post-Surgery

Mayo ClinicGeneral Anesthesia

Mind Body Green Health5 Ways to Bounce Back Quickly After Anesthesia

Science DailyWhat You Eat Before Surgery May Affect Your Recovery

University of Chicago MedicinePotatoes Prolong Anesthetic Reaction

~ Again, I am a layman. I do not hold any college degrees, nor mastery of knowledge. Please take what I say with a grain of salt. If curious, do your own research 😉 Validate my writings. Or challenge them. And ALWAYS feel free to consult with your physician. Always. Yours ~ Lisa

 

Endometriosis Excision Surgery 3.0

Lisa Howard - Resilience
Dr. Mel Kurtulus and I before heading in. Photo courtesy of Brandy Sebastian; used with her permission https://www.brandysebastian.com/

On July 18, 2018, I underwent my third robotic-assisted laparoscopic excision of Endometriosis by Dr. Mel Kurtulus ( of San Diego Womens Health).  As always, I love to share my experiences with you – not only to create awareness of this illness, but in the hopes that the process of my surgery (and later recovery) may help you, or others.

Before I go on, I just want to take a moment to express my joy in the above-photograph.  I am a detached head, floating beneath a fluffy warm-air blanket in the pre-op area, enjoying a wonderful moment with an incredible surgeon and man.  Thank you, Brandy, for capturing this.  And thank you, Dr. Kurtulus, for being so marvelous!

Okay, on with the nitty-gritty!

My mom, husband, and I were awake at 6am and in the hospital by 8am to check-in.  If you’ve never been to the Scripps Hospital La Jolla, it’s glorious.  Every attention to detail and the efforts of the staff are meant to soothe and calm: beautiful artwork, a live piano player in the lobby, and compassionate staff.  It’s wonderful.  We were joined by a wonderful friend and fellow EndoSister, Brandy, to document the experience (these photographs will be shared at a later date…I’m so excited about what she is doing!)  I was rolled back for pre-op somewhere around 11:30 and wheeled back to the OR by noon.  My surgery took approximately four hours.  And here I was worried he wouldn’t find any Endometriosis…(I should know better…)  We arrived home around 7:00pm.  A very, very long day for my friends and loved ones.

procedures

The plan was to open me up and peek under the hood, so to speak.  If any Endometriosis was discovered, Dr. Kurtulus would excise it; any adhesions would be freed; the ovarian cysts that were seen in ultrasounds would be removed; my ureters would be examined and freed of any adhesions; he’d look inside my bladder for any Endo or evidence of Interstitial Cystitis; and he would (with my willing and educated permission) remove both of my Fallopian tubes.

What did he find?  Following is a page of my op report, in case you enjoy reading all of the medical terminology (like I do).  I’ll also further explain what I understand and share photographs below!

op page

In a nutshell?  I had:

  • I was laid on a table, strapped in, and tilted somewhat upside-down.  Then a tiny hole was punched in my belly, 3 liters of CO2 gas was pumped in and I was inflated, and the doc took a peek around.  Three additional ports were added (tiny incisions) so tools and the robotic arms (tiny!) could be inserted.  On with the discovery:
  • A cyst on my right ovary;
  • A cyst on my left ovary;
  • Endometriosis on my cul de sac, small intestine, near my sigmoid colon, and on my left ovary and fallopian tube;
  • My fallopian tubes were hideous, “angry”, inflamed, swollen;
  • Adhesions on/near my sigmoid colon, my bladder, my fallopian tubes;
  • My sigmoid colon was stuck to the left side of my pelvis;
  • My bladder was pinned to my uterus;
  • My left ureter was surgically detached to allow safe access to Endometriosis lesions on my left ovary, then reattached once all-clear;
  • And (hooray!!!) NO evidence of Endometriosis was found on my liver or diaphragm (discovered there in prior surgeries).

During my post-op meeting, Dr. Kurtulus let me know that this time my Endometriosis lesions were all either clear or red.  He said they were almost grape-like.  I’m so pleased that he is so skilled and thorough during these procedures!!  And grateful he knows what to look for!

Ready for photos of my insides?  I don’t know if you can click on the photos and make them full-size, so if you ARE curious about the full-sized (and zoomable) versions of these photos, you can view them here.

The Fallopian Tubes

My Mum told me that when Dr. Kurtulus showed she and my husband the photographs after the procedure, he said my fallopian tubes were “angry” and swollen.  That description will stick with her for quite a while, especially when she saw the photographs.  I am so glad we had already discussed removing my fallopian tubes before my procedure; as he likely would have removed them due to their massive state.

I had a 3cm cyst on my right ovary, which he removed while saving my ovary.  Also,  a cyst and Endometriosis lesions on my left ovary, which he excised (still saving my left ovary).

FT and ovaries copy
The yellow circles are showing Endometriosis on my fallopian tubes

My husband and I don’t want children at our age, but it doesn’t make the medical sterility any easier to bear.  I have grieved and mourned and cried and sobbed.  I am feeling much better now (although sometimes it still hits hard) after talking about it with friends and family and I wanted to share some incredible words from a few friends that they shared to comfort me:

“You may no longer have fallopian tubes, but you got one of the biggest pair of brass balls I’ve seen.” ~Barbara Carrera

“It’s a good thing to have the diseased bits out of the way.  And now you don’t have to worry about condoms.  And it’s fun to imagine your ovaries as crazy, free-floating googley-eyes!  They’ve been unleashed!!  Fly my pretties!  Fly!!”  ~Sarah Mew

Thank you, ladies.  I needed those laughs. ❤

The cul de sac (aka Pouch of Douglas)

This is my third surgery and during both of my prior surgeries, I had Endometriosis in my cul de sac.  To quote both of my first two op reports, my cul de sac was “obliterated.” What the heck is a cul de sac?  It’s the little empty space between the back of the uterus and the rectum.  It’s usually very common for Endometriosis patients to have lesions in this area.  This time, most of my Endo was on the left side, rather than everywhere in that little pouch.  And, Dr. Kurtulus excised all that he saw.

PofD Before and After

I’m flabbergasted at the difference!!! But, here are more photos of what my cul de sac looked like before I was all tidied up:

PofD Additional copy
Again, circles indicate Endometriosis lesions that I’m aware of

The Small Bowel

Two lesions were discovered on my bowel.  Dr. Kurtulus brought in a colo-rectal surgeon to look at the lesions to determine if they could be removed superficially or if something greater would be required.  The colo-rectal surgeon confirmed the spots looked like Endometriosis, but I would require a resection of that bit of small intestine.  It’s close to my appendix, on the right side.  So, it’s still in there, but I did already have a consult with that colo-rectal surgeon on August 8th.  My surgery date for the resection is pending and may take place by the end of this year!

Bowel Pics

The Bladder and Uterus

When I saw the photographs of my bladder being pinned to my uterus and held in place by a literal web of adhesions, I was amazed!  AMAZED!  I’d been having pain often when I peed and wonder if it was related to anything-Endo.  So Dr. Kurtulus freed my bladder (he’s my hero!).  He also looked extensively at the inside and outside of my bladder and found no evidence of Endometriosis or Interstitial Cystitis (aka IC).

bladder uterus copy

The Cost of it All!

As usual, I LOVE to share what this type of surgery costs.  And, to date, this was the most expensive for my insurance company!  I paid a $500 co-pay to the hospital and my insurance covered a whopping $121,669.50!  Holy moly!!!  I’m still waiting to see if the colo-rectal surgeon will submit a separate bill for his time, as it wasn’t itemized on my Estimate of Benefits form.  Other than that, there shouldn’t be any sneak attack bills…I hope.  If you’re curious what my first and second surgeries cost, check this out!

Future Plans

I had my post-op appointment with Dr. Kurtulus on August 6th.  He spent some time with me going through the details, labeling the photographs, and talking about our future plans.  Did we pick curtains or china patterns? No.  We covered prospective treatments!  I’ll see him again for an 8-week follow-up in mid-September.

He brought up birth control and remembered I don’t want to take it as I feel it truly makes me a different person.  Then he mentioned Lupron Depot and Orilissa, but acknowledged (before I could say anything), that he knew I didn’t want to take those.  So, he wonderfully respected my opinions and desires; didn’t push anything.  Didn’t make me feel like I was a “hostile patient” or making poor choices.  And he supports my desire to strive toward an anti-inflammatory diet, keep a positive attitude, and pursue the bowel resection surgery as soon as I am able.

The Recovery Process

I fully intend to fully blog about my 2-week recovery and share my notes soon.  But I wanted to also mention it briefly here.  It wasn’t easy at times, but mostly it wasn’t hard.

My pre-op Endometriosis pain is 99% gone!  Just a little bit of “ugh” near the lower-right edge of my abdomen…and I may either just be healing or it’s the last bit of Endo clinging to my bowel waving at me.  I was even on my period! And it was so pain-free that it was a Sneak Attack period and caught me by surprise (the poor bed sheets).

The first week was a whole lot of paying attention to my body, small little walks, a mostly-liquid diet, lots of lounging on the couch-bed and watching Netflix.  There was the expected post-op pain the first day, a vomit on Day One (whoever wants to do that so soon after abdominal surgery?), sleepless nights, and difficulties getting comfortable.  And those first few days of hardly any sleep wasn’t easy on my husband or mother, who had to help me get in and out of bed multiple times throughout the night.

The second week I felt far more capable, although I didn’t do much of anything other rest and be lazy.  And I returned to work on August 6th.

I had very little shoulder pain related to the CO2 gas and I blame that on my surgical team’s skill in deflating me as much as possible and getting out as much gas as they could!  For anyone who doesn’t know that absolute agony of post-laparoscopy gas pain, please, read this! I did have a few episodes of that pain, but nothing in comparison to my first surgery.

It took three days to poop.  The discomfort was so great that I opted for an enema.  That is a tale in and of itself; one you shall never read about!!

My body is still healing: sitting too long causes discomfort; stairs are from the Devil; and  I don’t allow myself to squeeze out a poo – if I have to do more than just a gentle push, it’s not time yet.  No straining.  No lifting.  No pushing. No pulling.  BUT I have been cleared to go swimming in a pool (no lakes or oceans)…and we can have sex! We were recently brave enough to give it a go and I’m happy to report there was no pain or discomfort!

The last of my steri-strips were removed at my August 6, 2018, post-op appointment and they’re healing well.

 

BEFORE I GO…

I want to thank Dr. Kurtulus and his staff for their excellent care, the incredible nurses and other surgical team members at Scripps Hospital La Jolla, Brandy for her amazing photographs and the project she is working on, my Mum for driving out (yet again) to be with me for surgery and during a hardest days of my recovery, my husband for all that he’s endured with me, Erin for taking care of me for a few days, Rosie for spending time with me during my recovery, Laura & Chris & Carrie for their wonderful company to celebrate my health, Zeiddy for constantly checking in on me, my employers and co-workers for the beautiful flowers, and all of my EndoSisters, friends, and family who also threw me well-wishes and love.

This has been an amazing experience.

Be well. All of you.

~ Again, I am a layman. I do not hold any college degrees, nor mastery of knowledge. Please take what I say with a grain of salt. If curious, do your own research 😉 Validate my writings. Or challenge them. And ALWAYS feel free to consult with your physician. Always. Yours ~ Lisa

There was a cancellation!

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My August 15th surgery has just been bumped up to July 18th!!

My work is totally cool with the change.  HR even came in to offer some kind words followed by, “I’ve never been more excited for someone to get a surgery.”  He knows how much I’ve been hurting lately.

My Mum can still join us!

And I’m nervous and excited and scared and and and…the whole spectrum of emotions that bubble-up with a pending surgery.

Best news ever.