Natural Products that I’ve Fallen in Love With

Make-up in a kaboodle
I’ve turned into a girl…and had to buy a kaboodle!

Many of you may have read about parabens, dioxins, and endocrine disruptors that may play a role in influencing my Endometriosis symptoms (plus I’m a dirty hippy deep down inside).  I’ve kind of been on this little crusade since last year to go through my personal products and read the labels and find alternatives that I like as much (if not better). Well, my little collection is growing and I figured I’d share what I’ve fallen in love with during this search.  I’ve still got a few products in my cabinets that I’m looking to replace..but that’ll come eventually.

I’m not being paid or compensated to do these reviews.  These are just products that I’ve discovered and truly enjoy and wanted to pass on the word.  As I bump into more products that I love, I’ll continue to update this page with links and my thoughts…so feel free to come back and check it out.  More info on the products, including their ingredients, can be found on their respective links!

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An alternative to Lupron Depot, Letrozole, or Danazol?

Syringe for Lupron Depot injection

The Journal of Restorative Medicine has published an article by Dr. Edward Lichen in their December 2016 compilation about non-surgical treatment of Endometriosis.  You can read the article, in it’s entirety, by clicking on the link under “Resources,” but I wanted to give a brief overview of my interpretation:

Causation:

  • Causation continues to be a mystery.  An overview of the nine theories of causation is given.
  • DNA research is ongoing.
  • Estrogen plays a role.  Many women with Endometriosis cannot opt for estrogen replacement therapy (even if post-menopausal) due to high recurrence rates of estrogen stimulation.
  • Xenoestrogens, dioxins, and endocrine disruptors increase inflammation and can cause Endometriosis to develop/recur.
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Endometriosis & Eggs

Carton of one dozen eggs

Note: this is about eating eggs. If you’re looking for info on Endometriosis and freezing your eggs for fertility treatments, click here.

So you may know a lot of the dietary restrictions many people choose to follow with Endometriosis.  I’ve heard “don’t eat eggs,” and “eat eggs!”  I LOVE me some eggs, so have decided to continue to devour them, but am curious as to the whole “don’t eat eggs” mentality – and it’s something I’ve never really looked into.  I’m assuming it has to do with hormones and proteins, just like red meats and dairy, but will give it a looksy today.

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Why no dairy?

Pitcher and glass of milk

I’ve read a lot of books and webpages that say women with Endometriosis should avoid dairy.  I’ve taken that step as best I can.  I miss my cheese.  I miss bagels with cream cheese.  I miss sour cream.  But, I do feel better!  Very little bloating, cramping, or gas (but that may be a combination of the changes in my diet…).

But now I’m curious as to why “no dairy” and why I feel better for not having it…

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No red meat?

A cow and hamburger with a "no slash" through them

So, I’ve read time and time again that people with Endometriosis should avoid red meat.  I’ve altered my diet to avoid it as much as possible.  And have even written about it in small quantities in previous blogs.

But today I want to delve deeper into why: why no read meat? What does it do?  And I want proof; not just theories!  Let the research begin!

Some studies suggest that frequent consumption of red meat and ham increases the risk of developing Endometriosis. An Italian study published in 2003 found that there may be a link between diet and Endometriosis.  It also found that women who ate red meat seven or more times per week increased their risk of Endometriosis by 80-100%.  Women who ate ham three or more times per week were 80% more likely to have Endometriosis than women who ate less.  In comparison, women who ate vegetables and fish were 40% less likely of having Endometriosis.  This study was actually the combined data of two separate studies conducted on 504 women, and it reviewed their eating habits, lifestyles, and separated the women into two groups: who did or did not have Endometriosis.

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Tampons : Taboo ?

unused tampon

The History o’the Tampon

The Egyptians used softened papyrus as a makeshift tampons and the Greeks used lint wrapped around wood.  Other materials used in the past were wool, paper, plant fibers, sponges, grass, and cotton.

Early tampons available to women in the 1920s did not have an applicator.  Some had to be removed by actually reaching in and handling the cotton or gauze tampon, while others had strings for easy removal.  In 1929, Dr. Earl Haas invented a stringed tampon with an applicator.  He filed for the patent in 1931, and later trademarked the name “Tampax.”  The rights and product were then purchased by Gertrude Tendrich, who founded the Tampax company.  And in 1936, the first Tampax ad was launched and a package of 10 tampons cost a whopping 35 cents!  There are a lot more tampons on the market to choose from, some with applicators (cardboard or plastic), some without, some organic, some with odor control, some without.

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